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Andy Warhol, ‘"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, Multiple Edition Playing Cards’, 1971, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, Multiple Edition Playing Cards, 1971

Offset on cardstock
3 7/10 × 2 4/5 in
9.5 × 7 cm
This is part of a limited edition set.
$750
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $22 domestic, $33 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, multiple boxed edition playing cards, offset on …

Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Don Celender
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Vincent van Gogh
Dutch, 1853–1890
Follow

Primarily self-taught and unappreciated during his lifetime, Vincent van Gogh made over 900 paintings and 1,100 works on paper during the decade that he worked as an artist. Influenced by Jean-Francois Millet and the Barbizon School artists, van Gogh’s early work comprises dour portraits of Dutch peasants and depressing rural landscapes. In 1886-88 he moved to Paris, where Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism had a big impact on his painting. He brightened his palette, experimented with shorter brushstrokes, impasto, and complementary colors. The paintings he made in Paris announce the bolder Post-Impressionist style that he is best known for today. Emotionally unstable, humorless, and argumentative, van Gogh eventually had a breakdown and moved to an asylum in the south of France where he painted landscapes, portraits, interiors and still lifes steeped with personal symbolism.

Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
Follow

Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

Franz Kline
American, 1910–1962
Follow

Abstract Expressionist Franz Kline is known for his large black-and-white paintings that treat the medium of oil with a calligraphic freedom, influenced by his acquaintance with Willem de Kooning. Kline viewed his gestural painting not as an expression of his emotions but as a means to create a physical form and presence that could be felt by the viewer, and would inspire Minimalist sculptors like Donald Judd and Richard Serra with his reluctance to attribute hidden meanings to his work. Starting in the late 1950s, Kline executed a series of monumental works, known as the "wall paintings," and began to reintroduce color to his black-and-white palette.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Paul Jenkins
American, 1923–2012
Follow

An important figure in the New York School, Paul Jenkins contributed to the development of abstract expressionism in New York and abroad with his intuitive, chance-based approach to painting. Working first with oil paints and later acrylic, Jenkins poured paint directly on the canvas, allowing it to drip, bleed, and pool, as well as manipulating it with an ivory knife. Jenkins’s diaphanous streaks and gentle, fluid fields of color positioned him as an important figure in abstract expressionism, and he often exhibited in the same venues as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning—artists who shared his instinctual working method. “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it,” the artist once said.

Richard Pousette-Dart
American, 1916–1992
Follow

One of the earliest Abstract Expressionists, Richard Pousette-Dart explored a variety of painterly styles, including figurative work, all-over abstraction, pattern making, and Surrealist Automatism. Deeply influenced by Native American art and textiles, Pousette- Dart distanced himself from his contemporaries with an interest in spirituality, his paintings dealing with traditional dualities between light and substance, spirit and body, and harmony and discord. He favored heavy layers of acrylic and oils with small, thick brushstrokes to emphasize luminosity and distinctive colors.

Isamu Noguchi
American, 1904–1988
Follow

Isamu Noguchi was one of the 20th century’s most important and critically acclaimed sculptors and designers. Influenced by his mentor, Romanian sculptor Constantin Brancusi, and by the abstract forms of Jean Arp and Japanese Zen gardens, Noguchi gained acclaim in 1946 when his biomorphic interlocking stone sculptures were included in “14 Americans” at the Museum of Modern Art. Integrating Japanese aesthetics with Western modernism, he pursued a lifetime of artistic experimentation that transcended the boundaries of art, design, theater, and architecture. He brought his belief that sculpture should shape space to iconic design objects such as his series of “Akari Light Sculptures,” hanging or freestanding Shoji-paper, bamboo, and wire lamps with a clean, molded aesthetic. His iconic coffee table, a soft-cornered, triangular glass top above curved, asymmetrical wood supports, fueled a successful partnership with the modernist design manufacturer Herman Miller. He also collaborated on set designs with dancers/choreographers Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, and George Balanchine, and the composer John Cage.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Anthony Caro
British, 1924–2013
Follow

Considered one of the most influential practitioners of modern sculpture, Anthony Caro’s oeuvre explores the possibilities of three-dimensional abstraction. His large, floor-based works make use of a variety of materials, from wood to rope, though he is best known for his monumental rusted steel pieces. Caro’s Minimalist sculptures are finished with variegated textures and are architectural in form and scale. Odalisque (1984) represents Caro’s foray into sculpture made from found objects—such as buoys, dock bollards, shipping chains, and railroad-tie sections—which has been the hallmark of the artist’s more recent work. Caro worked as an assistant to Henry Moore in the 1950s, and was influenced by David Smith after being introduced in the early 1960s.

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Andy Warhol, ‘"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, Multiple Edition Playing Cards’, 1971, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, multiple boxed edition playing cards, offset on cardstock, black/white & color, edition size unknown, unsigned and unnumbered,
9.5 x 7 cm.
Set 1- featuring images of well known artists superimposed over images of baseball players on semi fictionally titled teams. …

Medium
Print
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Don Celender
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Vincent van Gogh
Dutch, 1853–1890
Follow

Primarily self-taught and unappreciated during his lifetime, Vincent van Gogh made over 900 paintings and 1,100 works on paper during the decade that he worked as an artist. Influenced by Jean-Francois Millet and the Barbizon School artists, van Gogh’s early work comprises dour portraits of Dutch peasants and depressing rural landscapes. In 1886-88 he moved to Paris, where Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism had a big impact on his painting. He brightened his palette, experimented with shorter brushstrokes, impasto, and complementary colors. The paintings he made in Paris announce the bolder Post-Impressionist style that he is best known for today. Emotionally unstable, humorless, and argumentative, van Gogh eventually had a breakdown and moved to an asylum in the south of France where he painted landscapes, portraits, interiors and still lifes steeped with personal symbolism.

Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
Follow

Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

Franz Kline
American, 1910–1962
Follow

Abstract Expressionist Franz Kline is known for his large black-and-white paintings that treat the medium of oil with a calligraphic freedom, influenced by his acquaintance with Willem de Kooning. Kline viewed his gestural painting not as an expression of his emotions but as a means to create a physical form and presence that could be felt by the viewer, and would inspire Minimalist sculptors like Donald Judd and Richard Serra with his reluctance to attribute hidden meanings to his work. Starting in the late 1950s, Kline executed a series of monumental works, known as the "wall paintings," and began to reintroduce color to his black-and-white palette.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Paul Jenkins
American, 1923–2012
Follow

An important figure in the New York School, Paul Jenkins contributed to the development of abstract expressionism in New York and abroad with his intuitive, chance-based approach to painting. Working first with oil paints and later acrylic, Jenkins poured paint directly on the canvas, allowing it to drip, bleed, and pool, as well as manipulating it with an ivory knife. Jenkins’s diaphanous streaks and gentle, fluid fields of color positioned him as an important figure in abstract expressionism, and he often exhibited in the same venues as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning—artists who shared his instinctual working method. “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it,” the artist once said.

Richard Pousette-Dart
American, 1916–1992
Follow

One of the earliest Abstract Expressionists, Richard Pousette-Dart explored a variety of painterly styles, including figurative work, all-over abstraction, pattern making, and Surrealist Automatism. Deeply influenced by Native American art and textiles, Pousette- Dart distanced himself from his contemporaries with an interest in spirituality, his paintings dealing with traditional dualities between light and substance, spirit and body, and harmony and discord. He favored heavy layers of acrylic and oils with small, thick brushstrokes to emphasize luminosity and distinctive colors.

Isamu Noguchi
American, 1904–1988
Follow

Isamu Noguchi was one of the 20th century’s most important and critically acclaimed sculptors and designers. Influenced by his mentor, Romanian sculptor Constantin Brancusi, and by the abstract forms of Jean Arp and Japanese Zen gardens, Noguchi gained acclaim in 1946 when his biomorphic interlocking stone sculptures were included in “14 Americans” at the Museum of Modern Art. Integrating Japanese aesthetics with Western modernism, he pursued a lifetime of artistic experimentation that transcended the boundaries of art, design, theater, and architecture. He brought his belief that sculpture should shape space to iconic design objects such as his series of “Akari Light Sculptures,” hanging or freestanding Shoji-paper, bamboo, and wire lamps with a clean, molded aesthetic. His iconic coffee table, a soft-cornered, triangular glass top above curved, asymmetrical wood supports, fueled a successful partnership with the modernist design manufacturer Herman Miller. He also collaborated on set designs with dancers/choreographers Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, and George Balanchine, and the composer John Cage.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Anthony Caro
British, 1924–2013
Follow

Considered one of the most influential practitioners of modern sculpture, Anthony Caro’s oeuvre explores the possibilities of three-dimensional abstraction. His large, floor-based works make use of a variety of materials, from wood to rope, though he is best known for his monumental rusted steel pieces. Caro’s Minimalist sculptures are finished with variegated textures and are architectural in form and scale. Odalisque (1984) represents Caro’s foray into sculpture made from found objects—such as buoys, dock bollards, shipping chains, and railroad-tie sections—which has been the hallmark of the artist’s more recent work. Caro worked as an assistant to Henry Moore in the 1950s, and was influenced by David Smith after being introduced in the early 1960s.

"ARTBALL"- Set #1, Don Celender, 1971, Multiple Edition Playing Cards, 1971

Offset on cardstock
3 7/10 × 2 4/5 in
9.5 × 7 cm
This is part of a limited edition set.
$750
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $22 domestic, $33 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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