Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Artists' Cookbook: Conversations with 30 Contemporary Painters and Sculptors (SIGNED by Author)’, 1977, Alpha 137 Gallery

Offer! Price includes complimentary (free) shipping to anywhere in the world!
FANTASTIC SCARCE VINTAGE SPIRAL BOUND 1977 PUBLICATION OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NYC, SIGNED AND INSCRIBED BY AUTHOR MADELEINE CONWAY - makes a terrific gift!
ARTISTS' COOKBOOK
155 Recipes
Conversations with Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors
by Madeleine Conway and Nancy Kirk
This extremely rare, out of print and long sold out gem of a book is far more than a cookbook. There is a brief interview and revealing biographical commentary on each artist (food is the pretext, but one gets a sense of the artists lifestyle and predilictions from their answers) followed by a photographic portrait and chosen recipes. This vintage 1977 copy of The Museum of Modern Art Artists' Cookbook, features the following contemporary art stars (!!!!)
Richard Anuszkiewicz; Will Barnet; Romare Bearden; Louise Bourgeios; Christo; Salvador Dali; Allan D'Arcangelo; Richard Estes; Audrey Flack; Helen Frankenthaler; Red Grooms; Robert Indiana; Paul Jenkins; Alex Katz; Elaine De Kooning; Willem De Kooning; Roy Lichtenstein; Richard Lindner; Marisol; Robert Motherwell; Alice Neel; Lowell Nesbitt; Philip Pearlstein; Larry Rivers; George Segal; Raphael Soyer; Ernest Soyer; Andy Warhol; Tom Wesselmann; Jack Youngerman.
Each artist is pictured and has a page written about the food they eat and cook with recipes following. 165 pages with index. There are also pictures of all the artists on the back cover.
We will not tell you what Andy Warhol's favorite recipe is. Though a hint is that he describes how he told the author he had sworn off salt, sugar and beloved junk food. But you'd have to buy the book to find out what his submission is!
There is expected shelfwear to the cover (front and back), esp. corner bending, creasing, some time staining (age wear), grubbiness, etc. Otherwise, in good vintage condition. Interior pages with the recipes are in very good condition. Not ex-library; NO markings whatsoever.
An illuminating and highly collectible vintage reference. Used book. Signed by author.

Please check out our other listings and FOLLOW us on Artsy:
https://www.artsy.net/alpha-137-gallery/works

Signature: Boldly signed and inscribed "Best wishes and Bon Appetit" in red marker on the first front end page by author Madeleine Conway.

Publisher: Museum of Modern Art, MoMA, New York, NY

MOMA

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York

About Richard Anuszkiewicz

Combining an interest in the nature of perception with investigations into the visual and psychological resonance of color, Richard Anuszkiewicz produces paintings whose vibrant colors and geometric shapes seem to pop and pulsate off of the canvas. A student of Josef Albers and one of the leading practitioners of Op art and geometric abstraction, Anuszkiewicz explores color and form in his flat, vibrant abstractions, attempting to reveal the malleability of our perceptions of stillness and movement, depth and color.

American, b. 1930, Erie, Pennsylvania

About Will Barnet

American, 1911-2012, Beverly, Massachusetts, based in New York, New York

Solo Shows

2016
New York, NY, United States,
1950s Works on Paper
2014
New York, NY, United States,
Will Barnet: A Tribute
2011
New York, NY, United States,
Small Works on Paper From the 1950's
2010
New York, NY, United States,
Recent Abstract Paintings
2003
New York, NY, United States,
Abstraction and Figuration

About Romare Bearden

A pioneer of African-American art and celebrated collagist, Romare Bearden seamlessly blended images of African-American life in the urban and rural South with references to popular culture, religion, and Classical art and myth. He depicted jazz musicians, monumental subjects, nudes, or mythological characters set against abstract, fragmented backgrounds. Each of his collages integrated images painted in gouache, watercolors, oil paints, which he would then fix to paper or canvas. Bearden sought to give the African-American experience a universal, monumental, and Classical representation: he would often recast Classical events with African-American subjects, as in The Return of Odysseus (Homage to Pintoricchio and Benin) (1977). By rendering Odysseus, Penelope, and Telemachus as African-Americans, Bearden drew the political injustices of his time into a universal, allegorical context.

American, 1911-1988, Charlotte, North Carolina, based in New York, New York

About Louise Bourgeois

Beginning her artistic practice in her native Paris, Louise Bourgeois was originally associated with Surrealism due to her integration of fantastic elements into her prints and sculptures. Upon moving to New York in 1938, Bourgeois focused primarily on sculpture, crafting biomorphic forms that curator Lucy Lippard has described as enacting the physicality of the body as experienced from within. Bourgeois’s suggestive organ-like contours and early use of unconventional materials (like resin, latex, and cloth) allude to a tension between quintessentially male and female forms. This recurrent interrogation of the male/female dialectic aligns Bourgeois with the Feminist movement, but her work has also been examined through the lens of Abstract Expressionism, as she exhibited with artists such as Robert Motherwell, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko.

French-American, 1911-2010, Paris, France, based in New York & Paris

About Christo

Christo is best known for monumental collaborations with his late partner Jeanne-Claude. The duo’s projects, such as The Gates in Central Park and Wrapped Reichstag intervened in public spaces in order to draw attention to them. “We borrow space and create gentle disturbances for a few days,” Christo once said. “We inherit everything that is inherent in the space to become part of the work of art. All our projects are like fabulous expeditions.” Since Jeanne-Claude’s passing, Christo has worked to complete unrealized projects such as Over The River, a miles-long stretch of fabric that would function as a canopy over the Arkansas River. In gallery spaces, Christo presents schematic drawings of the duo’s work, which exhibit the artist’s technical mastery and undergird their massive installations, connecting the big ideas to their inception as free-floating thoughts.

American-Bulgarian, b. 1935, Gabrovno, Bulgaria, based in New York, New York

About Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips. “Each morning when I awake, I experience again a supreme pleasure,” he once said. “That of being Salvador Dalí.”

Spanish, 1904-1989, Figueres, Spain

About Allan D'Arcangelo

Painter and printmaker Allan D’Arcangelo is best known for his abstract paintings of highways and road signs, or “Pop imagery snugged into formal tropes of hard-edged abstraction,” as a New Yorker reviewer once described it. Often depicted from the driver’s perspective, D’Arcangelo’s paintings incorporate simplified, flat color planes and fragmented geometric forms, superimposing cropped road signs, forms resembling broken glass, and vague highway imagery over two-dimensional, endlessly rolling landscapes. D’Arcangelo always maintained a strong fascination with industrial imagery and scenery, and is considered one of the earliest American Pop artists.

American, 1930-1998, Buffalo, New York

Fair History on Artsy

2014
G. W. Einstein Company, Inc at IFPDA Print Fair 2014

About Richard Estes

Considered a founder of the Photorealist movement, Richard Estes is best known for his paintings of city scenes in New York. Compiling his compositions from multiple source photographs, Estes reconstructs reality in highly convincing renderings. He often incorporates reflective surfaces, such as shop windows and shiny cars, yielding mirrored imagery that serves to enhance what the naked eye is capable of perceiving. In Double Self-Portrait (1976), for example, the artist and an entire street scene behind him are reflected in meticulous detail against the glass façade of a diner.

American, b. 1932, Kewanee, Illinois

Exhibition Highlights

2017
2016
Marlborough Graphics, New York,
2016
New York,
Shrines to Speed Art And The Automobile: From The Minimal To The Postmodern

About Audrey Flack

One of the first photorealist painters to be included in the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, Audrey Flack focused the early years of her career on large-scale paintings of still lifes that drew from 17th-century Dutch vanitas painting—updated through a contemporary lens—and brought feminine identities under scrutiny. In meticulous, complex arrangements of fruit, flowers, candles, makeup, and ladies’ accouterments, Flack’s loaded symbolic tableaus address stereotypes of the female ideal. Since the 1980s, Flack has turned her focus to monumental sculpture: “Making sculpture attracted me because of its substantiality,” she has said. In her Neoclassical public sculptures of gilded bronze angels, muses, and goddesses, Flack mines Greek mythology, presenting the female in an array of archetypal guises. Though some critics have condemned her focus on the classical white female, Flack is an avowed feminist, and many of her sculptures seek to reinvent their subjects and source material.

American, b. 1931, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Helen Frankenthaler

A second-generation Abstract Expressionist painter, Helen Frankenthaler became active in the New York School of the 1950s, initially influenced by artists like Arshile Gorky, Willem de Kooning, and Jackson Pollock. She gained fame with her invention of the color-stain technique—applying thin washes of paint to unprimed canvas—in her iconic Mountains and Sea (1952), a motivating work for Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and other Color Field painters who emerged in the ’60s. Her own canvases, however, often evoked elements of landscape or figuration in the shaping of their forms. “My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates,” she once said. “They're not nature per se, but a feeling.” From 1958 to 1971, she was married to fellow Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell, who, like Frankenthaler, worked in symbolic painted gestures—only her paintings were almost always visibly improvised from start to finish. As poet and critic Frank O’Hara wrote in 1960, “she is willing to risk everything on inspiration.” In addition to painting, Frankenthaler also made ceramics, welded steel sculptures, and set designs, but the related medium that most attracted her, and in which her achievement came the closest painting, was printmaking—especially the creation of woodcuts, hers counting among the greatest of contemporary works in that medium.

American, 1928-2011, New York, New York, based in New York and Darien, Connecticut

About Red Grooms

Red Grooms’ “Ruckus Manhattan” in the mid-1970s humorously transformed Grand Central Terminal into a 3-D caricature of New York City. “I wanted to do a novelistic portrait of Manhattan from Battery Park to Grant’s tomb,” Grooms explained. The comic-book inspired interactive installation included iconic landmarks—the subway, Central Park, the Apollo Theater, the Woolworth building—populated by life-sized wooden figures of prostitutes, thieves, gamblers, tourists, shoppers, and families, revealing the city’s grit as well as its glamour. It was lauded for its effect of turning Manhattan—then threatening and oppressive—into a place of wonder. Since then, Grooms has “made a career of affectionate parody,” according one critic, through satirical, pop culture-infused prints and sculptural tableaux in homage to his adopted city.

American, b. 1937, Nashville, Tennessee, based in New York, New York

About Robert Indiana

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” In his paintings, sculptures, and prints, he mimics and re-arranges the words and numbers of a myriad of signs, including the Phillips 66 gas station logo and the “Yield” traffic sign. He is most famous for his “Love” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix. His “LOVE” painting was reproduced on a postage stamp in 1973; his “LOVE” sculptures are installed in public spaces worldwide.

American, b. 1928, New Castle, Indiana, based in New York, New York

About Paul Jenkins

An important figure in the New York School, Paul Jenkins contributed to the development of abstract expressionism in New York and abroad with his intuitive, chance-based approach to painting. Working first with oil paints and later acrylic, Jenkins poured paint directly on the canvas, allowing it to drip, bleed, and pool, as well as manipulating it with an ivory knife. Jenkins’s diaphanous streaks and gentle, fluid fields of color positioned him as an important figure in abstract expressionism, and he often exhibited in the same venues as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning—artists who shared his instinctual working method. “I try to paint like a crapshooter throwing dice, utilizing past experience and my knowledge of the odds. It’s a big gamble, and that’s why I love it,” the artist once said.

American, 1923-2012, Kansas City, Missouri

About Alex Katz

New York School painter Alex Katz developed his highly stylized aesthetic in reaction to 1950s Abstract Expressionism, finding his own distinctive resolution between formalism and representation. His brightly colored figurative and landscape paintings are rendered in a flat style that takes cues from everyday visual culture like advertising and cinema, in many ways anticipating both the formal and conceptual concerns of Pop Art. Well known for his many portraits of his wife and muse, Ada, Katz has also dedicated himself to printmaking and freestanding sculptures of cutout figures painted on wood or aluminum.

American, b. 1927, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Elaine de Kooning

The wife of Willem de Kooning, Elaine de Kooning was a prolific and versatile painter, writer, and teacher. Though she was closely associated with the New York School and Abstract Expressionism, de Kooning eschewed developing a singular style and instead painted in a range of modes from realism to abstraction. “Style is something I’ve always tried to avoid. I’m more interested in character,” she said. The subjects in her work also varied, including mythology, landscapes, and portraiture; one of her later bodies of work was inspired by the cave paintings in Lascaux. She studied widely with different artists including Milton Resnick, Stuart Davis, and Raphael Soyer. De Kooning also spent time at Black Mountain College, where she designed a stage set for Merce Cunningham and John Cage.

American, 1918-1989, Brooklyn, New York

About Willem de Kooning

A first-generation Abstract Expressionist, Willem de Kooning is one of the most important artists of the 20th century. In 1950s New York, when painters like Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline were moving away from representational imagery toward pure abstraction, de Kooning maintained a commitment to the figurative tradition, developing a signature style that fused vivid color and aggressive paint handling with deconstructed images of the female form—a then-controversial body of works that has become known as his “Women” paintings. “Flesh was the reason oil paint was invented,” he famously said. Influenced by Arshile Gorky and Pablo Picasso, de Kooning was often thought to have blended Cubism, Expressionism, and Surrealism in his signature style, paving the way for generations of gestural figurative painters like Cecily Brown. Following his “Women” series, de Kooning pursued non-objective lyrical abstraction until his death in 1997.

Dutch, American, 1904-1997, Rotterdam, Netherlands, based in New York and East Hampton, New York

Solo Shows

2017
New York,
PICASSO - DE KOONING

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York

Group Shows

2016
2016
London,
New Tate Modern Switch House: Extension and Installation
2015
Miami,
Recent Acquisitions + Highlights from the MDC Permanent Art Collection

About Richard Lindner

A successful illustrator for Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, Richard Lindner took up painting in his 50s, drawing on expressionistic exaggeration, Surrealist fantasy, and Cubist manipulations of form. He became known for erotic and enigmatic renderings, first based on memories from his childhood in Germany and later inspired by the vulgar, fetishistic aspects of life in New York. His harsh colors and highly defined outlines exaggerated the garishness of the streetwalkers, circus women, and men in uniform that became his favorite subjects. Overtones of Berlin’s cabaret culture of the 1930s infuse his style. Although his work shares some aspects of Pop art, he avoided the association.

German, 1901-1978, Hamburg, Germany

Fair History on Artsy

About Marisol

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Venezuelan, 1930-2016, Paris, France, based in New York, New York

About Robert Motherwell

Alongside Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell is considered one of the great American Abstract Expressionist painters. His esteemed intellect not only undergirded his gorgeous, expressive paintings—frequently featuring bold black shapes against fields of color—but also made Motherwell one of the leading writers, theorists, and advocates of the New York School. He forged close friendships with the European Surrealists and other intellectuals over his interests in poetry and philosophy, and as such served as a vital link between the pre-war avant-garde in Europe and its post-war counterpart in New York, establishing automatism and psychoanalysis as central concerns of American abstraction. "It's not that the creative act and the critical act are simultaneous," Motherwell said. "It's more like you blurt something out and then analyze it.

American, 1915-1991, Aberdeen, Washington, based in New York and Greenwich, Connecticut

About Alice Neel

Alice Neel, one of the great portraitists of the 20th century, made starkly honest paintings of relatives, lovers, friends, and neighbors. A successor to the expressionism of Chaim Soutine, Edward Munch, and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Neel used distorted drawing and invented color to reveal the character beneath each sitter’s physical appearance. Neel worked in obscurity for most of her career, painting a range of locals from salesmen to the homeless, but during the last two decades of her life, she finally gained recognition, receiving many honors and awards. Her later paintings include portraits of celebrity artists like Andy Warhol and Marisol, as well notable people such as Mayor Ed Koch and Bella Abzug.

American, 1900-1984, Marion Square, Pennsylvania

About Lowell Nesbitt

American, 1933-1993

Solo Shows

2013
New York,
Lowell Nesbitt, Pistils & stamens

About Philip Pearlstein

Known for his paintings of nudes with almost clinical objectivity, Philip Pearlstein has been scrutinizing the body since the early 1960s, painting it as it is and avoiding idealization. Attuned to art history, Pearlstein is as interested in pattern and composition as he is in the body itself. He creates still life-like, visually complex arrangements by entangling his models with pieces of furniture, colorful rugs and blankets, and an assortment of objects, like a decoy swan or a whirligig. His model of 18 years, Desiree Avarez wrote: “He is fascinated with the beauty of form, and by beauty I mean power. This is a man studying structure and the math of its glamour as deeply as the ancient philosophers. As if understanding the essence of the endoskeleton might uncover the sublime.”

American, b. 1924, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York

Fair History on Artsy

2013
Hill Gallery at The Armory Show 2013

About Larry Rivers

Painter, sculptor, poet, and musician Larry Rivers was an established figure in the New York School, recognized for creating large paintings merging abstract and narrative elements, as in Washington Crossing the Delaware (1953), where the general leads his men through a space defined by murky oil washes and broad gestural brushwork. Rivers studied in the late 1940s under Hans Hofmann, the artist often regarded as the grandfather of Abstract Expressionism, but he never abandoned figuration, his compositions often including human subjects and text, as in Vocabulary Lesson (Polish) (1964). Rivers’ work is often compared to that of postmodern artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, and is considered an important precursor to Pop art. As Andy Warhol once said, “Larry’s painting style was unique—it wasn’t Abstract Expressionism and it wasn’t Pop, it fell into the period in between. But his personality was very Pop.”

American, 1923-2002, Bronx, New York, based in New York, Southampton, New York and Zihuatanejo, Mexico

About George Segal

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

American, 1924-2000, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

About Raphael Soyer

Once dubbed the “East Side Degas,” Russian-Jewish émigré and social-realist painter Raphael Soyer depicted ordinary men and women in contemporary settings. While studying at the Art Students League of New York under Guy Pène du Bois, he was influenced by the Ashcan School’s faithful representations of daily life in New York City’s poorer corners. Soyer rejected abstract art, stating, “I choose to be a realist and a humanist in art.” In sympathetic renderings of the unemployed during and after the great economic crash of 1929, many of Soyer’s paintings came to embody the Depression, as in the drawn, weary face and soft eyes that gaze out of Portrait of Walter Broe (1932). Soyer also painted women in large numbers and various forms throughout his career, including nudes, shop-girls, prostitutes, and pedestrians, displaying a love for and fascination with the manifold faces of humanity.

Russian-American, 1899-1987, Tombov, Russia, based in New York, New York

Fair History on Artsy

2014
Forum Gallery at The Armory Show 2014

About Tom Wesselmann

Tom Wesselmann is considered one of the major artists of New York Pop Art, along with Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Best known for his 1960s series “Great American Nude,” which featured flat figures in an intense palette of red, white, blue, and other patriotic colors, Wesselmann, in an effort to reject Abstract Expressionism, made collages and assemblages that incorporated everyday objects and advertising ephemera. In the early 1980s, he produced his first "Metal Works,” in which he shaped canvases and cut metal to create abstract three-dimensional images. In his final years, Wesselmann returned to the female form in the “Sunset Nudes” series, where the compositions, abstract imagery, and sanguine moods recall the odalisques of Henri Matisse.

American, 1931-2004, Cincinnati, OH, United States, based in New York, NY, United States

About Jack Youngerman

Jack Youngerman’s work combines hard-edged geometry with organic forms and fluid contours. Influenced by Henri Matisse while living in Paris in the 1940s and ’50s, Youngerman creates vibrant painted compositions, occasionally within shaped canvases. His works conjure various associations: Matisse’s paper cutouts, Rorschach patterns, and kaleidoscopic mandalas. After Youngerman returned to New York in the mid-1950s, his work was grouped with and exhibited alongside his contemporaries Ellsworth Kelly and Frank Stella.

American, b. 1926, St. Louis, Missouri

Group Shows

2017
Southampton,
"The Organic Impulse in Contemporary Art & Design"