Andy Warhol, ‘Flash (FS II.41) (November 22, 1963 Portfolio)’, 1968, Revolver Gallery

Title: Flash (FS II.41) (November 22, 1963 Portfolio)
Medium: Portfolio of eleven screenprints, colophon, and Teletype text on paper
Year: 1968
Size: 21” x 21”
Edition: 22, 26 numbered in Roman numerals; 10-lettered A-J has three additional screenprints, each of which is a composite of images from II.33 and II.38. (See II.43A-43C.)
Details: Each print, housed in a folder with a page of Teletype text, is signed in ballpoint pen on verso; the colophon is signed and numbered in ballpoint pen.

FLASH (FS II.41) (NOVEMBER 22, 1963 PORTFOLIO)

This image is part of a portfolio of eleven different screenprints based on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 and was named for all the “news flash” texts that were being broadcast at the time. All of the prints were based on campaign posters, mass-media photographs, and advertisements. The prints were presented next to Teletype text taken straight from news sources. Flash (FS II.41) (November 22 1963 Portfolio) features President Kennedy’s face delicately outlined in purple on a black background, creating a quiet portrait of the President.

FLASH (FS II.41) (NOVEMBER 22, 1963 PORTFOLIO) AS PART OF ANDY WARHOL’S LARGER BODY OF WORK:

This body of work has a clear connection to the work Warhol did focusing on Jacqueline Kennedy, however now he is focusing on the man himself, and the events surrounding his assassination. Still based on the anger around the medias interpretation of the incident and the constant news flashes. He is starting to look at American society and the relationship they have with the media and the obsession with tragedy, which he continues to return to in later works.

Signature: Signed

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York