Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's
Andy Warhol, ‘Flash - November 22, 1963’, 1968, Christie's

Each signed in ball-point pen on the reverse, from the edition of two hundred (there were also 26 sets numbered in Roman numerals and ten lettered A-J with three additional screenprints), published by Racolin Press, New York, printed by Aetna Silkscreen Products, New York, lacking the cover, plexiglass box, teletype text and colophon, the full sheets, generally in very good condition, each framed
Images & Sheets 533 x 533 mm.

From the Catalogue:
In 1968 Warhol created Flash, a portfolio of eleven screenprints reflecting on the unfolding media spectacle surrounding President John F. Kennedy's assassination by Lee Harvey Oswald in 1963. The collective obsession with the Kennedy assassination, a potent combination of celebrity and tragedy, fascinated Warhol.

'When President Kennedy was shot that fall, I heard the news over the radio while I was alone painting in my studio. I don't think I missed a stroke. I wanted to know what was going on out there, but that was the extent of my reaction. I'd been thrilled about having Kennedy as president; he was handsome, young, smart - but it didn't bother me that much that he was dead. What bothered me was the way television and radio were programming everybody to feel so sad. It seemed like no matter how hard you tried, you couldn't get away from the thing.’ (Andy Warhol, POPism: The Warhol Sixties, London 2007, p. 77).

Source images for FLASH included campaign posters, an advertisement for the rifle used by Lee Harvey Oswald, press photographs of Oswald escorted by Texas Rangers after his arrest, and the now iconic image of Jackie Kennedy smiling from the Lincoln Continental stretch limousine moments before her husband’s death. Warhol’s approach to this material is, however, far from literal. Avoiding narrative sequence or an hierarchy of events, images are taken out of context, re-arranged and overprinted, with the effect that the sources are obscured rather than documented. Shifting layers of truth and fiction are suggested by the motif of a film clapper which Warhol transposes onto photographs of both Kennedy and Oswald. Does this describe the choreography of news reportage by the tabloid press for maximum effect, or does it allude to the darker conspiracy theories around JKF’s assassination? Warhol’s use of colour heightens the dramatic pitch of the series. However, while the blues for Jackie and the red and black for JFK are evocative of mourning, violence and death, the shocking pink used for Oswald, and the innocuous green of the murder weapon seem arbitrary, disrupting any preconceived notions of colour and meaning. Disorientating and elusive, Warhol’s FLASH presciently evokes the fragmented reality of our information-saturated world, in which facts, imagination and lies become indistinguishable.
—Courtesy of Christie's

Feldman & Schellmann II.32-41

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, based in New York, NY, United States