Andy Warhol, ‘"MoMA Groundbreaking Shovel", 2001, ONE of EIGHT, 2001, New Moma, Museum of Modern Art NYC’, 2001, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"MoMA Groundbreaking Shovel", 2001, ONE of EIGHT, 2001, New Moma, Museum of Modern Art NYC’.

This is one of only eight shovels used for the groundbreaking ceremony of MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art expansion, 11 West 53rd Street New York NY, May 10th, 2001.

Signature: Not signed

Manufacturer: MoMA, Museum of Modern Art

Provenance: Private Collection, NY

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About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, based in New York, NY, United States

About Pablo Picasso

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Spanish, 1881-1973, Malaga, Spain, based in Paris and Mougins, France

About Jackson Pollock

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

American, 1912-1956, Cody, Wyoming, based in East Hampton, New York