Andy Warhol, ‘New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) IIIA 46’, 1983, Revolver Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) IIIA 46’, 1983, Revolver Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) IIIA 46’, 1983, Revolver Gallery

Title: New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) (FS IIA.46)
Medium: Screenprint on Stonehenge Grey Paper.
Year: 1983
Size: 15 1/4” x 22 1/8″
Edition: From a small number of impressions. This work comes with a Certificate of Authenticity from the Estate of Andy Warhol and is stamped by the Estate of Andy Warhol and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, INC.

NEW YORK POST (JUDGE BLASTS LYNCH) (FS IIA.46)

This print is a revised version of the front page of the New York Post newspaper, dated April 1, 1963. While the headline alludes to an event that occurred, in this case the jurisdiction of a race-related crime, Warhol decidedly chose to leave out specifics, only highlighting the major talking points. The focus of this piece is not on the individual topic itself, but on the repetitive and compelling nature of American tabloids.

This work was purchased from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and is sold with a Certificate of Provenance, indicating the work originates from the Estate of Andy Warhol, and thence, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

NEW YORK POST (JUDGE BLASTS LYNCH) (FS IIA.46) AS PART OF ANDY WARHOL’S LARGER BODY OF WORK

Much of Andy Warhol’s fascination with money, celebrities and mundane grocery store items is that they are all ubiquitous. Every American has held a dollar bill or has encountered an image of Marilyn Monroe at some point in his or her life. The news is one of the most attention-grabbing forms of media that pervades American society. Because of this, Warhol created pieces, like the New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) print, that mirrored the repetitive, attention-commanding nature of American media. Aspects that are very much alive and well in today’s culture.

Signature: From a small number of impressions. This work comes with a Certificate of Authenticity from the Estate of Andy Warhol and is stamped by the Estate of Andy Warhol and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, INC.

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York