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"New York: The New Art Scene", 1967, First Edition, First Printing by Ugo Mulas & Alan Solomon, Photographs by Ugo Mulas, Text by Alan Solomon,
bound in publisher's coarse cloth covered boards with spine lettered in black.
A fantastic copy of this seminal photography book
Condition:
Excellent- dust …

Medium
Condition
Excellent- dust jacket has few tears taped, slight shelf wear, binding hinge slightly separating, previous owners inscription (see pics).
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Holt Rinehart Winston, New York

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

High auction record
$105.4m, Sotheby's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Whitney Museum of American Art
Selected exhibitions
2019
Andy Warhol: By Hand, Drawings 1950s-1980sNew York Academy of Art
"Andy Warhol: Revelation"Andy Warhol Museum
2018
Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back AgainWhitney Museum of American Art
View all

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions
2021
Vera List and The Posters of Lincoln CenterLincoln Center Editions
2016
Roy Lichtenstein: Re-FigureCastelli Gallery
2012
Roy Lichtenstein: Landscapes in the Chinese StyleGagosian
View all

Tom Wesselmann is considered one of the major artists of New York Pop Art, along with Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Best known for his 1960s series “Great American Nude,” which featured flat figures in an intense palette of red, white, blue, and other patriotic colors, Wesselmann, in an effort to reject Abstract Expressionism, made collages and assemblages that incorporated everyday objects and advertising ephemera. In the early 1980s, he produced his first "Metal Works,” in which he shaped canvases and cut metal to create abstract three-dimensional images. In his final years, Wesselmann returned to the female form in the “Sunset Nudes” series, where the compositions, abstract imagery, and sanguine moods recall the odalisques of Henri Matisse.

High auction record
$10.7m, Sotheby's, 2008
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
Tom WesselmannAlmine Rech
Tom Wesselmann: FlowersGagosian
2018
Wesselmann: 1963–1983Gagosian
View all

It is not surprising that Larry Poons’ gestural, emotional, and improvisational paintings are borne from an artist who originally studied to become a professional musician. In the 1960s, Poons left the New England Conservatory of Music to pursue a career in painting, a decision honored with nearly immediate success—Poons’ early works, Op art paintings of circles and dots, were included in a MoMA exhibition when he was just 28. These illusionistic paintings evoked rhythm and an underlying musicality, yet a move toward Abstract Expressionism would introduce an even greater presence of the artist’s psyche is his work. In Poons’ action paintings, his gestures and energy were expressed through buckets of paint he had thrown at the canvas. Even his later works, painted by brush, recall the same energy in their expressive use of color and seemingly infinite number of frenetic brushstrokes.

High auction record
$1.2m, Sotheby's, 2014
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2021
COLOR FIELD PAINTINGLeslie Feely
IMPACTLeslie Feely
Larry PoonsAlmine Rech
View all

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

High auction record
$3.3m, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
James Rosenquist: His American LifeAcquavella Galleries
2017
James Rosenquist Painting as ImmersionMuseum Ludwig
2015
International PopWalker Art Center
View all

One of the most widely recognized female artists of the 1960s, Lee Bontecou creates welded wall reliefs, hanging sculptures, and miniature, mystical drawings that reflect her interest in natural and man-made forms. Brown and black in tone and often with ominous, organic voids at their centers, her large-scale patchwork accumulations of canvas, leather, wire mesh, and muslin recall nests, machines, ancient architecture, and the human body. She constructs her massive, free-hanging forms from constellations of steel, shaped canvas, porcelain curios, and explosive lengths of wire that reach far into space. Through such works, Bontecou has sought to capture “as much of life as possible—no barriers—no boundaries—all freedom in every sense,” she says.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
Drawn Together AgainThe FLAG Art Foundation
2018
Local Histories: Works from the Friedrich Christian Flick Collection at Hamburger BahnhofHamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin
2015
Surrealism: The Conjured LifeMCA Chicago
View all

John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus. “My work has nothing to do with car wrecks,“ he has said. “I believe common materials are the best materials.” With its emphasis on paint finishes and the raw materials’ lines and seams, his work has been described as a kind of three-dimensional Abstract Expressionist painting. While his breakthrough work dates form the 1960s (namely in sculpture), he has also more recently worked with large-scale photography.

High auction record
$5.5m, Sotheby's, 2018
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
John Chamberlain: ENTIRELYFEARLESSGagosian
2017
John Chamberlain: MasksGagosian
2016
John Chamberlain: Poetic FormGagosian
View all

Although often associated with both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, Jim Dine did not identify with a specific movement, producing a vast oeuvre of paintings, drawings, works on paper, sculpture, poetry, and performances. Emerging as a pioneer (together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman) of New York’s Happenings of the 1960s, Dine would carry the spontaneous energy of this movement throughout his style, which emphasized the exploration of everyday life. Personally significant objects were Dine’s primary motifs, as in his iconic series of hearts and robes. He championed a return to figuration after a period of more concept-dominated works, and is considered an important figure in Neo-Dada and a forerunner of Neo-Expressionism. “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there,” he once said.

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions
2020
Jim Dine, The Classic PrintsTemplon
Jim Dine - A Day LongerTemplon
2018
Jim Dine: PrintsTandem Press
View all

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

High auction record
€8.9m, Christie's, 2009
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
CubismCentre Pompidou
2016
New Tate Modern Switch House: Extension and InstallationTate
This Is a Portrait If I Say So: Identity in American Art, 1912 to TodayBowdoin College Museum of Art
View all

Jasper Johns's ongoing stylistic and technical experimentation place him at the forefront of American art. His richly textured paintings of maps, flags, numbers, and targets laid the groundwork for Pop art, Minimalism, and Conceptual art. In New York in the 1950s, Johns was part of a community of artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, seeking an alternative to the emotional nature of Abstract Expressionism. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, Johns's early work paired the concerns of craft with familiar concrete imagery. His interest in process also led to innovations in lithography, screen-printing, etching and woodblock, using such materials as pencil, pen, brush, crayon, wax, and plaster to constantly challenge the technical possibilities of printmaking.

High auction record
$36.0m, Sotheby's, 2014
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
Jasper Johns: Recent Paintings & Works on PaperMatthew Marks Gallery
2018
Fragment According to WhatGemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl
2017
PrintsGalerie Lelong & Co.
View all

An originator of Abstract Expressionism, Barnett Newman changed the course of 20th-century American painting. Newman’s monumental color field paintings consist of rectangles of rich, often mono- or bi-chromatic color that, when viewed from close proximity, are meant to confer a powerful spiritual experience, an encounter with the sublime. Newman’s signature “Zip” paintings, the artist’s term for paintings with a narrow vertical stripe dividing planes of color, provide each painting with an architectural frame, such as in his iconic work Vir Heroicus Siblimis (1950-1951).

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
The Mid Century Modern AestheticAlpha 137 Gallery
2016
Barnett NewmanKunstmuseum Basel
2015
Barnett Newman: The Late WorkThe Menil Collection
View all

An innovative colorist, Kenneth Noland began his career as an Abstract Expressionist, became one of the first practitioners of Color Field painting as part of the Washington Color School, and ultimately embraced a Minimalist approach that comprised vivid color and simple geometric shapes. His most iconic works are subtly direct compositions of chevrons, concentric circles, stripes, and diamonds, such as Pent (1966). Noland also pioneered the use of shaped canvases, painting on increasingly asymmetrical canvases that rendered the edge of equal compositional importance to the center.

High auction record
$4.3m, Sotheby's, 2021
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim Museum
Selected exhibitions
2020
Noland: FlaresPace Gallery
2019
Kenneth NolandAlmine Rech
2017
Kenneth NolandPace Prints
View all

“I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something more than sit on its ass in a museum,” wrote Claes Oldenburg in his seminal 1961 manifesto I Am For An Art. From his Happenings beginning in the 1960s, to his enormous public sculptures of ice cream and rubber stamps, to his collaboration with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, Oldenburg has remained at the forefront of the Conceptual and Pop art movements. He has worked in a variety of mediums including performance, drawing, and writing, though he is best known for his large glossy or soft sculptures of ordinary consumer items, such as Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks (1969-74). Some of Oldenburg’s most radical works remain in the realm of concept, as in his proposal for Thames Ball (1967)—a giant toilet tank ball that would have floated on the Thames River. “I am for an art that grows up not knowing it is art at all,” he wrote. “I am for an artist who vanishes.”

High auction record
$3.6m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
Claes Oldenburg: A Survey of Print and Sculpture EditionsGemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl
2018
Claes Oldenburg at Gemini G.E.L. - Selected WorksGemini G.E.L.
2016
Los Angeles to New York: The Dwan Gallery, 1959-1971National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
View all

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

High auction record
$88.8m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Rauschenberg: In and About L.A.Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Rauschenberg: The 1/4 MileLos Angeles County Museum of Art
2017
Faurschou Foundation VeniceFaurschou Foundation
View all

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

High auction record
$1.0m, Christie's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2018
Time TalksKrakow Witkin Gallery
George SegalTemplon
2017
George SegalICA Miami
View all

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

High auction record
$28.1m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2016
Frank Stella: A RetrospectiveModern Art Museum of Fort Worth
Frank Stella: A Retrospectivede Young Museum
2015
Frank Stella: A RetrospectiveWhitney Museum of American Art
View all

"New York: The New Art Scene", First Edition, First Printing by Ugo Mulas & Alan Solomon,, 1967

Print
14 × 12 × 4 in
35.6 × 30.5 × 10.2 cm
.
$1,500
Certificate
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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"New York: The New Art Scene", 1967, First Edition, First Printing by Ugo Mulas & …

Medium
Condition
Excellent- dust jacket has few tears taped, slight shelf wear, binding hinge slightly separating, previous owners inscription (see pics).
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Holt Rinehart Winston, New York

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

High auction record
$105.4m, Sotheby's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Whitney Museum of American Art
Selected exhibitions (3)

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions (3)

Tom Wesselmann is considered one of the major artists of New York Pop Art, along with Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Best known for his 1960s series “Great American Nude,” which featured flat figures in an intense palette of red, white, blue, and other patriotic colors, Wesselmann, in an effort to reject Abstract Expressionism, made collages and assemblages that incorporated everyday objects and advertising ephemera. In the early 1980s, he produced his first "Metal Works,” in which he shaped canvases and cut metal to create abstract three-dimensional images. In his final years, Wesselmann returned to the female form in the “Sunset Nudes” series, where the compositions, abstract imagery, and sanguine moods recall the odalisques of Henri Matisse.

High auction record
$10.7m, Sotheby's, 2008
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

It is not surprising that Larry Poons’ gestural, emotional, and improvisational paintings are borne from an artist who originally studied to become a professional musician. In the 1960s, Poons left the New England Conservatory of Music to pursue a career in painting, a decision honored with nearly immediate success—Poons’ early works, Op art paintings of circles and dots, were included in a MoMA exhibition when he was just 28. These illusionistic paintings evoked rhythm and an underlying musicality, yet a move toward Abstract Expressionism would introduce an even greater presence of the artist’s psyche is his work. In Poons’ action paintings, his gestures and energy were expressed through buckets of paint he had thrown at the canvas. Even his later works, painted by brush, recall the same energy in their expressive use of color and seemingly infinite number of frenetic brushstrokes.

High auction record
$1.2m, Sotheby's, 2014
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

High auction record
$3.3m, Sotheby's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

One of the most widely recognized female artists of the 1960s, Lee Bontecou creates welded wall reliefs, hanging sculptures, and miniature, mystical drawings that reflect her interest in natural and man-made forms. Brown and black in tone and often with ominous, organic voids at their centers, her large-scale patchwork accumulations of canvas, leather, wire mesh, and muslin recall nests, machines, ancient architecture, and the human body. She constructs her massive, free-hanging forms from constellations of steel, shaped canvas, porcelain curios, and explosive lengths of wire that reach far into space. Through such works, Bontecou has sought to capture “as much of life as possible—no barriers—no boundaries—all freedom in every sense,” she says.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

John Chamberlain is best known for his twisting sculptures made from scrap metal and banged up, discarded automobile parts and other industrial detritus. “My work has nothing to do with car wrecks,“ he has said. “I believe common materials are the best materials.” With its emphasis on paint finishes and the raw materials’ lines and seams, his work has been described as a kind of three-dimensional Abstract Expressionist painting. While his breakthrough work dates form the 1960s (namely in sculpture), he has also more recently worked with large-scale photography.

High auction record
$5.5m, Sotheby's, 2018
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Although often associated with both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, Jim Dine did not identify with a specific movement, producing a vast oeuvre of paintings, drawings, works on paper, sculpture, poetry, and performances. Emerging as a pioneer (together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman) of New York’s Happenings of the 1960s, Dine would carry the spontaneous energy of this movement throughout his style, which emphasized the exploration of everyday life. Personally significant objects were Dine’s primary motifs, as in his iconic series of hearts and robes. He championed a return to figuration after a period of more concept-dominated works, and is considered an important figure in Neo-Dada and a forerunner of Neo-Expressionism. “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there,” he once said.

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project
Selected exhibitions (3)

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

High auction record
€8.9m, Christie's, 2009
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Jasper Johns's ongoing stylistic and technical experimentation place him at the forefront of American art. His richly textured paintings of maps, flags, numbers, and targets laid the groundwork for Pop art, Minimalism, and Conceptual art. In New York in the 1950s, Johns was part of a community of artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, seeking an alternative to the emotional nature of Abstract Expressionism. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, Johns's early work paired the concerns of craft with familiar concrete imagery. His interest in process also led to innovations in lithography, screen-printing, etching and woodblock, using such materials as pencil, pen, brush, crayon, wax, and plaster to constantly challenge the technical possibilities of printmaking.

High auction record
$36.0m, Sotheby's, 2014
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

An originator of Abstract Expressionism, Barnett Newman changed the course of 20th-century American painting. Newman’s monumental color field paintings consist of rectangles of rich, often mono- or bi-chromatic color that, when viewed from close proximity, are meant to confer a powerful spiritual experience, an encounter with the sublime. Newman’s signature “Zip” paintings, the artist’s term for paintings with a narrow vertical stripe dividing planes of color, provide each painting with an architectural frame, such as in his iconic work Vir Heroicus Siblimis (1950-1951).

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

An innovative colorist, Kenneth Noland began his career as an Abstract Expressionist, became one of the first practitioners of Color Field painting as part of the Washington Color School, and ultimately embraced a Minimalist approach that comprised vivid color and simple geometric shapes. His most iconic works are subtly direct compositions of chevrons, concentric circles, stripes, and diamonds, such as Pent (1966). Noland also pioneered the use of shaped canvases, painting on increasingly asymmetrical canvases that rendered the edge of equal compositional importance to the center.

High auction record
$4.3m, Sotheby's, 2021
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim Museum
Selected exhibitions (3)

“I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something more than sit on its ass in a museum,” wrote Claes Oldenburg in his seminal 1961 manifesto I Am For An Art. From his Happenings beginning in the 1960s, to his enormous public sculptures of ice cream and rubber stamps, to his collaboration with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, Oldenburg has remained at the forefront of the Conceptual and Pop art movements. He has worked in a variety of mediums including performance, drawing, and writing, though he is best known for his large glossy or soft sculptures of ordinary consumer items, such as Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks (1969-74). Some of Oldenburg’s most radical works remain in the realm of concept, as in his proposal for Thames Ball (1967)—a giant toilet tank ball that would have floated on the Thames River. “I am for an art that grows up not knowing it is art at all,” he wrote. “I am for an artist who vanishes.”

High auction record
$3.6m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

High auction record
$88.8m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

High auction record
$1.0m, Christie's, 2014
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

High auction record
$28.1m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Andy Warhol
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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