Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery
Andy Warhol, ‘Paris Review (II.18, Feldman & Schellman) ’, 1967, Alpha 137 Gallery

For true Warhol fans, this is a large and impressive work that would look fantastic in a bar - but it would also look terrific in any other room in your home or business. This signed and numbered, fantastic early screenprint on cream wove paper from the fabulous 1960s is printed with black and red ink and has die cut holes to resemble a liquor store receipt - writ large, quite literally. It was made during a time in which Warhol was contemplating the everyday receipt as an art object. The work was part of a series of prints created as a fundraiser for the Paris Review literary publication over the years by more than 50 renowned artists, including Robert Indiana, Roy Lichtenstein, Ellsworth Kelly, Helen Frankenthaler, Christo, Willem de Kooning, Louise Bourgeois, Alex Katz, Robert Rauschenberg, and many others. One of the New York founders of the Review, George Plimpton, was known for his wild parties at his Upper East Side apartment (which doubled as the Paris Review office), blocks away from the liquor store where Warhol bought alcohol. For his contribution to the Paris Review print series, Warhol enlarged a receipt from Regency Wine & Liquor and made it out for two bottles of Blair House scotch and one of vodka. The print illustrates what George Plimpton, called Warhol’s "notion that the banal is indeed not," and it is indeed a homage to Regency Wine & Liquor as well as perhaps Plimpton's legendary parties. It is stamped with Andy Warhol's famous rubber stamp signature- also a deliberate artistic statement from Warhol at that time that his stamped signature was as valid as his hand. An iconic 1960s print for true Warhol fans.
Paris Review, New York, publisher; Chiron Press, New York, printer
Catalogue Raisonné: II.18, Feldman & Schellman
Stamped with Andy Warhol's rubber stamp signature and numbered in pencil lower right. Very good condition with no apparent issues; unframed.

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Signature: Stamp Signed with Andy Warhol's personal rubber stamp signature and numbered 55/150 in pencil lower right

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York