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"POP ART USA", 1963, Exhibition catalogue presented by the Oakland Art Museum and the California College of Arts & Crafts; organized by John Coplans;shown September 7 to 29-1963,
at the OAKLAND ART MUSEUM.
Uncle Sam (stapled) wraps as issued, and as shown. 60 pages, plus artist shorts at end. …

Medium
Signature
Not signed as issued., not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Oakland Art Museum and the California College of Arts & Crafts

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

High auction record
$105.4m, Sotheby's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Whitney Museum of American Art
Selected exhibitions
2019
Andy Warhol: By Hand, Drawings 1950s-1980sNew York Academy of Art
"Andy Warhol: Revelation"Andy Warhol Museum
2018
Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back AgainWhitney Museum of American Art
View all

When John Coplans takes up photography in the mid '80s after a long career as a writer, editor and museum director, he chooses his own aging body as his vehicle for aesthetic expression. Mapping out different parts of his body - hands, feet, and knees-or showing off in full, as in the multi panelled Friezes and the magnificent Upside Down series, he touches on subjects as diverse as abstraction, seriality, Classical sculpture, beauty and decay. Although his black and white photographs always carry the description 'Self Portrait' in their titles, the face is never seen, thus letting the body do the talking. His photographs are included in the collections of more than sixty museums in Europe, United States, and elsewhere.

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2020
John Coplans & Michael Schmidt. The Lingering Drama of the BodyGalerie Nordenhake
2019
A Body of Work—John CoplansThe Merchant House
John Coplans, June Crespo, Florian Slotawa | ParentescosGalerie Nordenhake
View all

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

High auction record
$52.5m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Louisiana on Paper: Ed Ruscha - VERYLouisiana Museum of Modern Art
2017
Ed Ruscha: Custom-Built Intrigue: Drawings 1974–1984Gagosian
2016
Ed Ruscha and the Great American Westde Young Museum
View all

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions
2021
Roy Lichtenstein: SelectionsGemini G.E.L.
Vera List and The Posters of Lincoln CenterLincoln Center Editions
2016
Roy Lichtenstein: Re-FigureCastelli Gallery
View all

Best known for his paintings of cakes, pies, pastries, and toys, Wayne Thiebaud hadn’t planned on becoming a visual artist. He apprenticed as a cartoonist at Walt Disney studios and intended to work as a commercial illustrator, but his friend Robert Mallary turned him towards a career in fine art. Thiebaud was friendly with Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning, but avoided their Abstract Expressionism in favor of a figural style. Though Thiebaud is most often grouped with the Pop art movement for his subject matter, the artist considers himself “just an old fashioned painter,” and “not a card carrying Pop artist.” He remains best known for his still lifes of confections—sometimes painted from his own memories—which he considers interpretations of “Americanness.” In his works, objects and their shadows are characteristically outlined in multiple colors, creating a visual effect Thiebaud calls akin to vibration.

High auction record
$19.1m, Christie's, 2020
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions
2019
Wayne Thiebaud Mountains: 1965-2019Acquavella Galleries
2017
Wayne Thiebaud: Land SurveyAllan Stone Projects
2016
Wayne ThiebaudAllan Stone Projects
View all

Mel Ramos’s provocative, humorous paintings mix idealized nude women with the imagery of popular culture—Coca Cola bottles, movie posters, and the like. A prolific artist from his emergence in the 1960s onward, Ramos has often based his nudes on the female celebrities of the day, from Marilyn Monroe to Scarlett Johansson. His style references the sensuality and glossy flatness of pin-ups and Playboy spreads and has drawn the ire of feminists and art critics alike, despite Ramos’s assertion that his works are “apolitical”. Though clearly aligned with Pop art in his appropriation of imagery from mass media and consumer products, Ramos calls his practice rooted in Surrealism and its emphasis on “absurd conjunctions”—in his case, a beautiful nude woman emerging from a Snickers wrapper or lounging seductively in a banana split.

High auction record
£1.1m, Sotheby's, 2012
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
Mel Ramos, A Pop Icon, the 1970's and Beyond, A Print SurveyDavid Lawrence Gallery
2019
Mel RAMOS: Memorial ExhibitionModernism Inc.
2018
In Memory of Mel RamosGalerie Ernst Hilger
View all

"POP ART USA", 1963, Exhibition Catalogue, Oakland Art Museum/California College of Arts & Crafts, 1963

Lithograph on paper
10 × 5 in
25.4 × 12.7 cm
.
$300
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"POP ART USA", 1963, Exhibition catalogue presented by the Oakland Art Museum and the …

Medium
Signature
Not signed as issued., not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Oakland Art Museum and the California College of Arts & Crafts

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

High auction record
$105.4m, Sotheby's, 2013
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Whitney Museum of American Art
Selected exhibitions (3)

When John Coplans takes up photography in the mid '80s after a long career as a writer, editor and museum director, he chooses his own aging body as his vehicle for aesthetic expression. Mapping out different parts of his body - hands, feet, and knees-or showing off in full, as in the multi panelled Friezes and the magnificent Upside Down series, he touches on subjects as diverse as abstraction, seriality, Classical sculpture, beauty and decay. Although his black and white photographs always carry the description 'Self Portrait' in their titles, the face is never seen, thus letting the body do the talking. His photographs are included in the collections of more than sixty museums in Europe, United States, and elsewhere.

Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

High auction record
$52.5m, Christie's, 2019
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

High auction record
$95.4m, Christie's, 2015
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Lincoln Center Editions
Selected exhibitions (3)

Best known for his paintings of cakes, pies, pastries, and toys, Wayne Thiebaud hadn’t planned on becoming a visual artist. He apprenticed as a cartoonist at Walt Disney studios and intended to work as a commercial illustrator, but his friend Robert Mallary turned him towards a career in fine art. Thiebaud was friendly with Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning, but avoided their Abstract Expressionism in favor of a figural style. Though Thiebaud is most often grouped with the Pop art movement for his subject matter, the artist considers himself “just an old fashioned painter,” and “not a card carrying Pop artist.” He remains best known for his still lifes of confections—sometimes painted from his own memories—which he considers interpretations of “Americanness.” In his works, objects and their shadows are characteristically outlined in multiple colors, creating a visual effect Thiebaud calls akin to vibration.

High auction record
$19.1m, Christie's, 2020
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) , Anderson Collection at Stanford University
Selected exhibitions (3)

Mel Ramos’s provocative, humorous paintings mix idealized nude women with the imagery of popular culture—Coca Cola bottles, movie posters, and the like. A prolific artist from his emergence in the 1960s onward, Ramos has often based his nudes on the female celebrities of the day, from Marilyn Monroe to Scarlett Johansson. His style references the sensuality and glossy flatness of pin-ups and Playboy spreads and has drawn the ire of feminists and art critics alike, despite Ramos’s assertion that his works are “apolitical”. Though clearly aligned with Pop art in his appropriation of imagery from mass media and consumer products, Ramos calls his practice rooted in Surrealism and its emphasis on “absurd conjunctions”—in his case, a beautiful nude woman emerging from a Snickers wrapper or lounging seductively in a banana split.

High auction record
£1.1m, Sotheby's, 2012
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
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