Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects
Andy Warhol, ‘Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych)’, 1986, MultiplesInc Projects

Andy Warhol

Self-Portrait in Fright Wig and Artist´s Hand (diptych), 1986

Polaroids. Unique.

10,8 x 8,5 cm (each polaroid) Framed ca. 30x45 cm.

Provenance: Pat Hackett.

Accompanied by a letter from Pat Hackett on Andy Warhol´s studio stationary.

“One book that Andy and I always wanted to write together was: “Andy Warhol´s How To Paint” And there were going to be chapters in it on How to Draw.

For inspiration, he and I would periodically stop in at the used bookstores near Union Square and root around for how-to books from bygone decades. As things turned out, he died before we had a chance to actually write it, but once, at the 33rd Street Factory in 1986, he handed med his Big Shot polaroid camera and told me to take a picture of him as the teacher and of his hand, Drawing.

                                                                                   ----Pat Hackett

The photos were taken on one of the photo session days for the Fright Wig series. Andy wearing same black turtleneck. The Fright Wig polaroids were used to make acetates and screens for the iconic large paintings of the same images.

A single fright wig polaroid has sold on Christies in 2012 for over 60.000 USD including fees.

And much higher in private sales.

This auction is for both polaroid’s as they are considered one work. Never before brought for the open market. Please bid accordingly.

Pat Hackett is the author of The Andy Warhol Diaries.

Spanning the mid-1970s until just a few days before his death in 1987, THE ANDY WARHOL DIARIES is a compendium of the more than twenty thousand pages of the artist's diary that he dictated daily to Pat Hackett. In it, Warhol gives us the ultimate backstage pass to practically everything that went on in the world-both high and low. He hangs out with "everybody": Jackie O ("thinks she's so grand she doesn't even owe it to the public to have another great marriage to somebody big"), Yoko Ono ("We dialed F-U-C-K-Y-O-U and L-O-V-E-Y-O-U to see what happened, we had so much fun"), and "Princess Marina of, I guess, Greece," along with art-world rock stars Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francis Bacon, Salvador Dali, and Keith Haring.

Pat Hackett was also the co-author of Popism that she wrote with Andy Warhol. Other books as well.

Anecdotal, funny, frank, POPism is Warhol’s personal view of the Pop phenomenon in New York in the 1960s and a look back at the relationships that made up the scene at the Factory, including his rela­tionship with Edie Sedgewick, focus of the upcoming film Factory Girl. In the detached, back-fence gossip style he was famous for, Warhol tells all—the ultimate inside story of a decade of cultural revolution.

Anthony d’Offay, Warhol’s legendary London dealer, tells the tale of how this remarkable series came into being: “Whenever I saw Andy, I said it would be great to do a show with you in London. And he immediately agreed and asked what I would like him to do. And I said, it isn’t for me to decide, what would you like to do? We got nowhere on several occasions along that line,” d’Offay recalls with a laugh. “I realized that it would only work if I came up with an idea that he liked. I felt it was imperative that whatever image we chose would be important and useful to his career.

An entry from Sunday, 13 July 1986, in The Andy Warhol Diaries, tells the artist’s side of the story: “The Show. The show. I mean, walking into a room full of the worst pictures you’ve ever seen of yourself, what can you say, what can you do? But they’re not the ones I picked. D’Offay ‘art-directed’ the whole show – he’d tell me he wanted a certain picture, and then I’d think he’d never remember, so I’d do the one I liked instead, and when he’d come back to New York he’d say that that wasn’t the one he’d picked... But he had class, he arrived at the hotel with his wife at 7:30 in the morning to say goodbye... Yeah, he was nice.”

Collection of Pat Hackett.

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York