Andy Warhol, ‘Shoes (FS 11.253)’, 1980, Revolver Gallery

Long before the Campbell’s soup cans, the Elizabeths, the Marilyns, and the Maos, there were Andy Warhol’s beloved shoes. Warhol loved to draw high heels, pumps, or jeweled stilettos. Many of them were blotted-line drawings, filled in with color, and created when the artist was a commercial fashion illustrator in the 1950s. In 1980, Andy Warhol returned to his roots as a commercial illustrator, by creating his Shoes series. Warhol implemented his signature style of repetition, arranging the shoes in a seemingly haphazard, yet methodical manner. The composition provides a candid perspective of shoes, spilled out on the floor in no particular order, but also presents the various views of the classic high-heel, leaving no element of the shoe hidden. The conceptualization of these prints, undoubtedly, is a revival of the beginning of his artistic career in which his specialty was none other than women’s shoes.

Signature: Edition of 60, signed and numbered in pencil on verso.

During the early 1980s, Andy Warhol was forming bonds with a number of younger artists in the New York art scene including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel and David Salle. Warhol saw a re-emergence of critical and financial success during this period of his life. It was at this time that he was inspired to create a series which paid homage to his beginnings as a commercial illustrator. His Shoes series, which includes Shoes FS II.253 was created alongside prints featuring identical images of shoes, but the second series is accented by multi-colors.

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York