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"The Rolodex" NY Art Seen, Time Capsule, 1950-1969

Ink on paper, plastic
9 1/2 in
24.1 cm
Unique
On loan
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

A time capsule from the zenith of New York’s 1950-60's art seen.
Its cards offer an unusually …

Read more

A time capsule from the zenith of New York’s 1950-60's art seen.
Its cards offer an unusually intimate glimpse into one of the most exciting moments of America’s artistic heritage.
This Rolodex belonged to an art dealer or agent—or perhaps a critic (but not the then all-powerful Clement Greenberg, as he is here, …

Read more
Medium
Sculpture
Signature
Not signed
Manufacturer
rolodex
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

John Cage
American, 1912–1992
Follow

One of the most influential composers of the 20th century and a leading figure in the post-war avant-garde, John Cage was a music theorist, writer, and artist, as well as a composer. His most famous piece, 4’33” (1952), consisted of musicians doing nothing but listening to the sounds in a room for the duration of 4 minutes and 33 seconds. For Cartridge Music (1960), he amplified small household objects in a live performance. Influenced by Indian philosophy, Zen Buddhism, and Duchamp’s readymades, Cage championed chance procedures in music, incorporating found sounds, noise, and alternative instruments into his compositions. Two important early collaborators were the painter Robert Rauschenberg and the dancer Merce Cunningham, who was also his romantic partner for most of their lives. Cage published his first book, Silence, in 1961 and, in the 1970s, began to transform literary works, including those of Joyce and Thoreau, into music.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Robert Indiana
American, 1928–2018
Follow

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” In his paintings, sculptures, and prints, he mimics and re-arranges the words and numbers of a myriad of signs, including the Phillips 66 gas station logo and the “Yield” traffic sign. He is most famous for his “LOVE” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix.

Robert Motherwell
American, 1915–1991
Follow

Alongside Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell is considered one of the great American Abstract Expressionist painters. His esteemed intellect not only undergirded his gorgeous, expressive paintings—frequently featuring bold black shapes against fields of color—but also made Motherwell one of the leading writers, theorists, and advocates of the New York School. He forged close friendships with the European Surrealists and other intellectuals over his interests in poetry and philosophy, and as such served as a vital link between the pre-war avant-garde in Europe and its post-war counterpart in New York, establishing automatism and psychoanalysis as central concerns of American abstraction. "It's not that the creative act and the critical act are simultaneous," Motherwell said. "It's more like you blurt something out and then analyze it.

Frank Stella
American, b. 1936
Follow

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
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Share
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

A time capsule from the zenith of New York’s 1950-60's art seen.
Its cards offer an unusually …

Read more

A time capsule from the zenith of New York’s 1950-60's art seen.
Its cards offer an unusually intimate glimpse into one of the most exciting moments of America’s artistic heritage.
This Rolodex belonged to an art dealer or agent—or perhaps a critic (but not the then all-powerful Clement Greenberg, as he is here, …

Read more
Medium
Sculpture
Signature
Not signed
Manufacturer
rolodex
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

John Cage
American, 1912–1992
Follow

One of the most influential composers of the 20th century and a leading figure in the post-war avant-garde, John Cage was a music theorist, writer, and artist, as well as a composer. His most famous piece, 4’33” (1952), consisted of musicians doing nothing but listening to the sounds in a room for the duration of 4 minutes and 33 seconds. For Cartridge Music (1960), he amplified small household objects in a live performance. Influenced by Indian philosophy, Zen Buddhism, and Duchamp’s readymades, Cage championed chance procedures in music, incorporating found sounds, noise, and alternative instruments into his compositions. Two important early collaborators were the painter Robert Rauschenberg and the dancer Merce Cunningham, who was also his romantic partner for most of their lives. Cage published his first book, Silence, in 1961 and, in the 1970s, began to transform literary works, including those of Joyce and Thoreau, into music.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Robert Indiana
American, 1928–2018
Follow

One of the central figures of the Pop Art movement, Robert Indiana takes his inspiration from commercial signs, claiming: “There are more signs than trees in America. There are more signs than leaves. So I think of myself as a painter of American landscape.” In his paintings, sculptures, and prints, he mimics and re-arranges the words and numbers of a myriad of signs, including the Phillips 66 gas station logo and the “Yield” traffic sign. He is most famous for his “LOVE” paintings and sculptures, first produced in the 1960s. Creating a block out of the word—with the “L” and the “O” set atop the “V” and the “E”—Indiana has effectively inserted his own sign into the mix.

Robert Motherwell
American, 1915–1991
Follow

Alongside Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell is considered one of the great American Abstract Expressionist painters. His esteemed intellect not only undergirded his gorgeous, expressive paintings—frequently featuring bold black shapes against fields of color—but also made Motherwell one of the leading writers, theorists, and advocates of the New York School. He forged close friendships with the European Surrealists and other intellectuals over his interests in poetry and philosophy, and as such served as a vital link between the pre-war avant-garde in Europe and its post-war counterpart in New York, establishing automatism and psychoanalysis as central concerns of American abstraction. "It's not that the creative act and the critical act are simultaneous," Motherwell said. "It's more like you blurt something out and then analyze it.

Frank Stella
American, b. 1936
Follow

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

"The Rolodex" NY Art Seen, Time Capsule, 1950-1969

Ink on paper, plastic
9 1/2 in
24.1 cm
Unique
On loan
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works from ARTephemera (1930-present)
Other works by Andy Warhol
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Related works
Most Similar
Minimalism
Abstract Expressionism