Andy Warhol, ‘"Twenty Years", 1977, SIGNED/Inscribed by Leo, Exhibition Catalogue, Leo Castelli Gallery, 1st Edition’, 1977, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Andy Warhol, ‘"Twenty Years", 1977, SIGNED/Inscribed by Leo, Exhibition Catalogue, Leo Castelli Gallery, 1st Edition’, 1977, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Andy Warhol, ‘"Twenty Years", 1977, SIGNED/Inscribed by Leo, Exhibition Catalogue, Leo Castelli Gallery, 1st Edition’, 1977, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"Twenty Years", 1977, catalogue, Leo Castelli Gallery, Signed/Inscribed by Leo Castelli, 1st Edition, 72 pages, 8.5" x 11"in. black/white photographic reproductions.
Condition:
Excellent- slight age toning to covers.
Provenance:
Private Collection, Italy
Note:
This softcover catalogue with stiff wraps was published on the occasion of a commemorative exhibition celebrating the 20 year anniversary of the legendary Leo Castelli Gallery. Artists who participated in this marvelous tribute to one of the greatest art dealers of the 20th century were:

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER, ROBERT BARRY, LEE BONTECOU, PETER CAMPUS, JOHN CHAMBERLAIN, NASSOS DAPHNIS, HANNE DARBOVEN, RON DAVIS, JAN DIBBETS, DAN FLAVIN, LAURI GRISI, DOUGLAS HUEBLER, JASPER JOHNS, DONALD JUDD, ELLSWORTH KELLY, JOSEPH KOSUTH, ROY LICHTENSTEIN, ROBERT MORRIS, BRUCE NAUMAN, KENNETH NOLAND, CLAES OLDENBURG, FRANK OWEN, ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG, JAMES ROSENQUIST, EDWARD RUSCHA, SALVATORE SCARPITTA, RICHARD SERRA, KEITH SONNIER, FRANK STELLA, CY TWOMBLY, PAUL WALDMAN, ANDY WARHOL, LAWRENCE WEINER.

Signature: Signed/Inscribed by Leo Castelli

Publisher: Leo Castelli Gallery, NYC

Private Collection, Germany

About Andy Warhol

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

American, 1928-1987, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, based in New York, NY, United States

About Dan Flavin

Utilizing fluorescent light tubing available on the commercial market, Dan Flavin created light installations (or “situations” as he preferred to call them) that became icons of Minimalism. Flavin’s wall- and floor-mounted, site-specific fixtures, composed of intersecting and parallel lines of light in conventional colors, flood spaces with their glow. A number of the sculptures feature tubes traversing corners or doorways, or at a right angle to the wall, further engaging the architecture of a room. As Flavin’s installations grew more complex, so too did the spaces built expressly for the purpose of exhibiting them. In 1959, when Flavin was shortly employed as a guard and elevator operator at the Museum of Modern Art, he met fellow Minimalists Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold, and Robert Ryman.

American, 1933-1996, Jamaica, New York

About Frank Stella

Frank Stella, an iconic figure of postwar American art, is considered the most influential painter of a generation that moved beyond Abstract Expressionism toward Minimalism. In his early work, Stella attempted to drain any external meaning or symbolism from painting, reducing his images to geometric form and eliminating illusionistic effects. His goal was to make paintings in which pictorial force came from materiality, not from symbolic meaning. He famously quipped, “What you see is what you see,” a statement that became the unofficial credo of Minimalist practice. In the 1980s and '90s, Stella turned away from Minimalism, adopting a more additive approach for a series of twisting, monumental, polychromatic metal wall reliefs and sculptures based on Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

American, b. 1936, Malden, Massachusetts, based in New York and Rock Tavern, New York

About Ed Ruscha

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

American, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, based in Los Angeles, California

About Richard Artswager

About Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns's ongoing stylistic and technical experimentation place him at the forefront of American art. His richly textured paintings of maps, flags, numbers, and targets laid the groundwork for Pop art, Minimalism, and Conceptual art. In New York in the 1950s, Johns was part of a community of artists, including Robert Rauschenberg, seeking an alternative to the emotional nature of Abstract Expressionism. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, Johns's early work paired the concerns of craft with familiar concrete imagery. His interest in process also led to innovations in lithography, screen-printing, etching and woodblock, using such materials as pencil, pen, brush, crayon, wax, and plaster to constantly challenge the technical possibilities of printmaking.

American, b. 1930, Augusta, Georgia, based in New York, New York

About Donald Judd

Donald Judd, widely regarded as one of the most significant American artists of the post-war period, is perhaps best-known for the large-scale outdoor installations and long, spacious interiors he designed in Marfa, Texas. His oeuvre has come to define what has been referred to as Minimalist art—a label the artist strongly objected to. His sculptures and installations, constructed out of industrial materials such as Plexiglas, concrete, and steel and arranged in precise geometric shapes, were intended to emphasize the purity of the objects themselves rather than any symbolic meaning they might have—“the simple expression of complex thought,” said Judd. His particular interest in architecture led him to design both the sculptures and the spaces in which they would be contained, influencing a generation of artists and designers from Anish Kapoor to David Batchelor.

American, 1928-1994, Excelsior Springs, Missouri

About Roy Lichtenstein

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

American, 1923-1997, New York, New York, based in New York and Southampton, New York

About Bruce Nauman

Using an array of media including video installation, performance, sculpture, and photography, Bruce Nauman is known for conceptual works that explore space, language, and the body. Nauman infuses his pieces with irony and humor, creating verbal and visual puns to often-unsettling effect, challenging viewers and making them aware of their own physicality. Nauman’s neon works explore the semantic and metaphorical possibilities that arise from subtly rearranging a few letters, such as in Run from Fear, Fun from Rear (1972).

American, b. 1941, Fort Wayne, Indiana, based in New Mexico

About James Rosenquist

Leading Pop artist James Rosenquist—who came to prominence among New York School figures like Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Willem de Kooning—is well known for his large-scale, fragmented works that bring the visual language of commercial painting onto canvas (notably, from 1957-60, Rosenquist earned his living as a billboard painter). In his use of mass-produced goods and vernacular culture rendered in an anonymous style, Rosenquist's work recalls that of Andy Warhol, while his seemingly irrational, mysterious pictorial combinations owe a debt to Surrealism. His breakthrough work, the iconic F-111 (1965)—51 panels that total over 22 by 24 feet—juxtaposes an American fighter plane with a Firestone tire, garish orange tinned spaghetti, and a young girl under a hair dryer.

American, 1933-2017, Grand Forks, North Dakota, based in Aripeka, Florida

About Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

American, 1925-2008, Port Arthur, Texas, based in New York and Captiva Island, Florida