Anne Lindberg, ‘Parallel 22’, 2009, TWO x TWO

Lindberg renders abstract images by using an architect’s parallel bar to draw tightly spaced lines of varying darkness and density. The result is a beautiful effect of speed at the hand of a careful and repetitive process, similar to the blur of a camera in motion.

New York artist Anne Lindberg renders abstract images by using an architect’s parallel bar to draw tightly spaced lines of varying darkness and density. The result is a beautiful effect of speed at the hand of a careful and repetitive process, similar to the blur of a camera in motion, an effect Lindberg makes present in Parallel 22. Lindberg states that her “drawings inhabit a non-verbal place resonant with such primal human conditions. Systemic and non-representational, these works are subtle, rhythmic, abstract, and immersive. I find beauty and disturbance through shifts in tool, layering and material to create passages of tone, density, speed, path and frequency within a system.” A 2011 Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors grantee, Anne Lindberg recently had solo installations at the Nevada Museum of Art, Reno; Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha; Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; Drawing Center, New York; Bom Retiro Cultural Center, São Paulo; and the Tegnerforbundet, Oslo.

About Anne Lindberg

In her delicate mixed-media drawings, sculptures, and installations, Anne Lindberg works literally line by line, creating textured, abstract compositions, which she describes as “mirror[s] of how I experience the world.” Her deceptively simple works—comprising graphite and colored pencil drawings on mat board or over photographs; thread drawings; thread-based sculptures and installations; and architectural interventions—are generated out of a meticulous and labor-intensive process. Each line is hand drawn, every thread is hand stretched into compositions that appear to ripple and shimmer, moving and shifting with the viewer’s own changing position. Lindberg is inspired by textiles and by the neurological and physiological networks of the human body. At once intensely physical and ethereal, her works elegantly reflect these living systems, as she explains: “The work references physiological systems—such as heartbeat, respiration, neural paths, equilibrium—and psychological states.”

American, b. 1962

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