Arman, ‘(25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91, Sidney Janis Gallery NYC.’, 1961-91, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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(25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91, Sidney Janis Gallery NYC., 1961-91

Print
8 × 10 1/2 in
20.3 × 26.7 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $35 domestic, $45 rest of world
Locked
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Learn more.
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

Sidney Janis Gallery NYC, (25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91.
Condition:
Excellent- 5 are withdrawn …

Medium
Books and Portfolios
Condition
Excellent- 5 are withdrawn from library with stamp inside first page as noted below (see pics).
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Not included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Sidney Janis Gallery, NYC
Arman
French-American, 1928–2005
Follow

Arman (born Armand Pierre Fernandez) was an early proponent of accumulation and scatter art. In 1959, he began displaying collections of objects in Plexiglas cases and creating installations of strewn garbage, which he called “Poubelles,” or “trash bins.” He also welded identical objects together to create larger sculptural pieces. In 1961, along with Yves Klein, Jean Tinguely, Jacques Villeglé, art critic Pierre Restany, and others, Arman founded Nouveau Réalisme, a group interested in new approaches to the concept of “reality.” Spending time in New York in the 1960s, Arman adopted destruction as a strategy for creating something new—slicing, burning, and smashing objects such as bronze statues and musical instruments to mount on canvas. Andy Warhol owned two of Arman’s Poubelles, and Arman appears in the Warhol’s 1964 film Dinner at Daley’s.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Jim Dine
American, b. 1935
Follow

Although often associated with both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, Jim Dine did not identify with a specific movement, producing a vast oeuvre of paintings, drawings, works on paper, sculpture, poetry, and performances. Emerging as a pioneer (together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman) of New York’s Happenings of the 1960s, Dine would carry the spontaneous energy of this movement throughout his style, which emphasized the exploration of everyday life. Personally significant objects were Dine’s primary motifs, as in his iconic series of hearts and robes. He championed a return to figuration after a period of more concept-dominated works, and is considered an important figure in Neo-Dada and a forerunner of Neo-Expressionism. “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there,” he once said.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Giorgio de Chirico
Italian, 1888–1978
Follow

The founder of the scuola metafisica, Giorgio de Chirico is best known for his metaphysical paintings, produced between 1909 and 1919. These melancholic renderings of low-lit town squares with long shadows and empty walkways would profoundly influence the Surrealists, including André Breton, Salvador Dalí, and René Magritte. In their thematic exploration of alienation, nostalgia, and myth, de Chirico’s works—many of which were exhibited at the Paris Salons—are also said to have influenced filmmakers such as Michelangelo Antonioni and draw parallels with contemporary works by Edward Hopper. De Chirico later rejected his earlier metaphysical style and became interested in traditional painting techniques, working in Neoclassical or neo-Baroque styles influenced by Raphael, Luca Signorelli, and Peter Paul Rubens. The Surrealists were publicly critical of this anti-modern development in de Chirico’s work and the artist eventually ended his association with the group. He cited the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche as a deep influence.

George Segal
American, 1924–2000
Follow

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

Michelangelo Pistoletto
Italian, b. 1933
Follow

A leading figure in the development of Arte Povera and Conceptual art, Michelangelo Pistoletto is best known for his “mirror paintings” beginning in the 1960s, which first used grounds of metallic paint on canvas before rejecting canvas entirely for polished steel. Pistoletto’s life-size, photo-silkscreened images of people atop highly reflective surfaces integrate the environment and viewer into the work. In his “minus objects,” sculptures that explore how objects become artworks through the ideas they express, Pistoletto uses “poor” materials as a liberation from the traditional art system, as in his 1967 work Venus of the Rags, a copy of the classical figure set against a mound of old clothes and rags. An early performance art innovator, Pistoletto founded The Zoo in the late 1960s, which joined artists, intellectuals, and the public for collaborative “actions” that unified art and daily life.

Richard Anuszkiewicz
American, 1930–2020
Follow

Combining an interest in the nature of perception with investigations into the visual and psychological resonance of color, Richard Anuszkiewicz produces paintings whose vibrant colors and geometric shapes seem to pop and pulsate off of the canvas. A student of Josef Albers and one of the leading practitioners of Op art and geometric abstraction, Anuszkiewicz explores color and form in his flat, vibrant abstractions, attempting to reveal the malleability of our perceptions of stillness and movement, depth and color.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Fernand Léger
French, 1881–1955
Follow

Working in Paris during the height of Cubism, Fernand Léger’s iconic style, with its emphasis on primary colors and rounded, massive forms, has become informally regarded as “Tubism.” Even at their most abstract, Léger’s subjects are easier to recognize than the rigorous Cubist dissections of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and the accessibility and contemporary subject matter of his works have led many to describe Léger as both populist and a forerunner of Pop Art. Interested in modern innovation, Léger joined the Puteaux Cubists, engaging with Robert Delaunay, Francis Picabia, and Jean Metzinger, among others. His interest in industry and machines was further encouraged by the Italian Futurist painters, and by his military service for France during World War I. While Léger would later revisit more traditional subjects—including the female nude, landscape and still life—these works retained his characteristically bold style.

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Arman, ‘(25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91, Sidney Janis Gallery NYC.’, 1961-91, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Save
View
View in room
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

Sidney Janis Gallery NYC, (25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91.
Condition:
Excellent- 5 are withdrawn from library with stamp inside first page as noted below (see pics).
Provenance:
Private Collection, NY

-1961, "The Sidney Janis Painters- Albers, Baziotes & 10 artists",
Volume 1, Number 3 (Ex. Library).

Medium
Books and Portfolios
Condition
Excellent- 5 are withdrawn from library with stamp inside first page as noted below (see pics).
Signature
Not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Not included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Sidney Janis Gallery, NYC
Arman
French-American, 1928–2005
Follow

Arman (born Armand Pierre Fernandez) was an early proponent of accumulation and scatter art. In 1959, he began displaying collections of objects in Plexiglas cases and creating installations of strewn garbage, which he called “Poubelles,” or “trash bins.” He also welded identical objects together to create larger sculptural pieces. In 1961, along with Yves Klein, Jean Tinguely, Jacques Villeglé, art critic Pierre Restany, and others, Arman founded Nouveau Réalisme, a group interested in new approaches to the concept of “reality.” Spending time in New York in the 1960s, Arman adopted destruction as a strategy for creating something new—slicing, burning, and smashing objects such as bronze statues and musical instruments to mount on canvas. Andy Warhol owned two of Arman’s Poubelles, and Arman appears in the Warhol’s 1964 film Dinner at Daley’s.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Josef Albers
German-American, 1888–1976
Follow

Josef Albers is best known for his seminal “Homage to the Square” series of the 1950s and '60s, which focused on the simplification of form and the interplay of shape and color. “Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature,” he once said. “I prefer to see with closed eyes.” His abstract canvases employed rigid geometric compositions in order to emphasize the optical effects set off by his chosen color palettes. Albers was highly influential as a teacher, first at the Bauhaus in Germany alongside Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, and later with posts at Black Mountain College, Yale, and Harvard; he taught courses in design and color theory, and counted among his students such iconic artists as Eva Hesse, Cy Twombly, Richard Anuszkiewicz, and Robert Rauschenberg. He is often cited among the progenitors of Minimalist, Conceptual, and Op art.

Jim Dine
American, b. 1935
Follow

Although often associated with both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, Jim Dine did not identify with a specific movement, producing a vast oeuvre of paintings, drawings, works on paper, sculpture, poetry, and performances. Emerging as a pioneer (together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman) of New York’s Happenings of the 1960s, Dine would carry the spontaneous energy of this movement throughout his style, which emphasized the exploration of everyday life. Personally significant objects were Dine’s primary motifs, as in his iconic series of hearts and robes. He championed a return to figuration after a period of more concept-dominated works, and is considered an important figure in Neo-Dada and a forerunner of Neo-Expressionism. “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there,” he once said.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Georges Braque
French, 1882–1963
Follow

French painter, collagist and sculptor Georges Braque is, along with Pablo Picasso, renowned as the co-founder of Cubism, which revolutionized 20th-century painting. In his work, objects are fragmented and reconstructed into geometric forms, fracturing the picture plane in order to explore a variety of viewpoints. “The hard-and-fast rules of perspective … were a ghastly mistake which…has taken four centuries to redress,” he said in 1957. Merging aspects of the sculptural with the pictorial, Braque was also an innovator in the use of collage, inventing a technique known as papier collé, which he first explored in one early work Fruit Dish and Glass (1912) by attaching pieces of wallpaper to a charcoal drawing. This approach deeply influenced not only his contemporaries but generations of artists from Modernism to the present.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Jean Dubuffet
French, 1901–1985
Follow

In his seminal modernist paintings, Jean Dubuffet delved deep into questions of ground and materiality. Such themes were highly charged during the post–WWII period in which he worked, shortly after the destruction of many European cities as well as the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the war. The surfaces of his canvases are thick and clotted; their aesthetic is muddy and scatological. Dubuffet coined the term “Art Brut” to describe the kind of work that he collected and aspired toward: the untrained, outsider art of alienated groups, including children and the mentally ill. His own paintings are purposefully “deskilled,” often possessing the spontaneity and crude aesthetic of finger paintings.

Giorgio de Chirico
Italian, 1888–1978
Follow

The founder of the scuola metafisica, Giorgio de Chirico is best known for his metaphysical paintings, produced between 1909 and 1919. These melancholic renderings of low-lit town squares with long shadows and empty walkways would profoundly influence the Surrealists, including André Breton, Salvador Dalí, and René Magritte. In their thematic exploration of alienation, nostalgia, and myth, de Chirico’s works—many of which were exhibited at the Paris Salons—are also said to have influenced filmmakers such as Michelangelo Antonioni and draw parallels with contemporary works by Edward Hopper. De Chirico later rejected his earlier metaphysical style and became interested in traditional painting techniques, working in Neoclassical or neo-Baroque styles influenced by Raphael, Luca Signorelli, and Peter Paul Rubens. The Surrealists were publicly critical of this anti-modern development in de Chirico’s work and the artist eventually ended his association with the group. He cited the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche as a deep influence.

George Segal
American, 1924–2000
Follow

Whether portraying modern couples sitting in a park (Gay Liberation, 1980), or a biblical family’s unfolding drama (Abraham’s Farewell to Ishmael, 1987), George Segal’s life-size human figures express the fragility of the human condition. Hyperrealism, achieved by making full-body casts of live models using plaster bandages, renders the figures familiar and emotionally resonant. As such, Segal has been seen by some to have rejected the cool calculations of Pop art, despite being considered a prominent exponent of the movement for his casual depictions of contemporary culture and everyday situations. Yet, covered in bright primary colors or whitewash, Segal’s figures emanate an otherworldly strangeness, prompting New York Times critic Roberta Smith to describe them as “emotionally confounding.”

Michelangelo Pistoletto
Italian, b. 1933
Follow

A leading figure in the development of Arte Povera and Conceptual art, Michelangelo Pistoletto is best known for his “mirror paintings” beginning in the 1960s, which first used grounds of metallic paint on canvas before rejecting canvas entirely for polished steel. Pistoletto’s life-size, photo-silkscreened images of people atop highly reflective surfaces integrate the environment and viewer into the work. In his “minus objects,” sculptures that explore how objects become artworks through the ideas they express, Pistoletto uses “poor” materials as a liberation from the traditional art system, as in his 1967 work Venus of the Rags, a copy of the classical figure set against a mound of old clothes and rags. An early performance art innovator, Pistoletto founded The Zoo in the late 1960s, which joined artists, intellectuals, and the public for collaborative “actions” that unified art and daily life.

Richard Anuszkiewicz
American, 1930–2020
Follow

Combining an interest in the nature of perception with investigations into the visual and psychological resonance of color, Richard Anuszkiewicz produces paintings whose vibrant colors and geometric shapes seem to pop and pulsate off of the canvas. A student of Josef Albers and one of the leading practitioners of Op art and geometric abstraction, Anuszkiewicz explores color and form in his flat, vibrant abstractions, attempting to reveal the malleability of our perceptions of stillness and movement, depth and color.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Fernand Léger
French, 1881–1955
Follow

Working in Paris during the height of Cubism, Fernand Léger’s iconic style, with its emphasis on primary colors and rounded, massive forms, has become informally regarded as “Tubism.” Even at their most abstract, Léger’s subjects are easier to recognize than the rigorous Cubist dissections of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and the accessibility and contemporary subject matter of his works have led many to describe Léger as both populist and a forerunner of Pop Art. Interested in modern innovation, Léger joined the Puteaux Cubists, engaging with Robert Delaunay, Francis Picabia, and Jean Metzinger, among others. His interest in industry and machines was further encouraged by the Italian Futurist painters, and by his military service for France during World War I. While Léger would later revisit more traditional subjects—including the female nude, landscape and still life—these works retained his characteristically bold style.

(25) Exhibition Catalogues, 1961-91, Sidney Janis Gallery NYC., 1961-91

Print
8 × 10 1/2 in
20.3 × 26.7 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $35 domestic, $45 rest of world
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera