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Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Judith and Holofernes’, ca. 1620, Galleria degli Uffizi
Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Judith and Holofernes’, ca. 1620, Galleria degli Uffizi
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Judith and Holofernes, ca. 1620

Oil on canvas
78 3/10 × 64 in
199 × 162.5 cm
Location
Florence
About the work
Articles
GU
Galleria degli Uffizi
Florence
Medium
Painting
Image rights
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain
Artemisia Gentileschi
Italian, 1593–1653
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A legendary figure and one of the first female artists to pursue a career on the same terms as men, Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi’s work is often overshadowed by the conflicting narratives that surround her, especially her rape by a colleague of her father at the age of 17 and the notorious trial that followed. Like her father, Orazio, with whom she trained, Gentileschi painted in the style of Caravaggio, illuminating her subjects with powerful stage lighting to heighten effects of emotional drama. Her figures were mostly heroic women drawn from history, mythology, and religious subject matter, including Cleopatra, Lucretia, and Mary Magdalene, often depicted nude and eroticized. Gentileschi’s most famous work, Judith Slaying Holofernes (c.1614–20), is notable for its brutality combined with a masterful rendering of flesh tones and fabrics.

Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Judith and Holofernes’, ca. 1620, Galleria degli Uffizi
Artemisia Gentileschi, ‘Judith and Holofernes’, ca. 1620, Galleria degli Uffizi
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
View more
About the work
Articles
GU
Galleria degli Uffizi
Florence
Medium
Painting
Image rights
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain
Artemisia Gentileschi
Italian, 1593–1653
Follow

A legendary figure and one of the first female artists to pursue a career on the same terms as men, Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi’s work is often overshadowed by the conflicting narratives that surround her, especially her rape by a colleague of her father at the age of 17 and the notorious trial that followed. Like her father, Orazio, with whom she trained, Gentileschi painted in the style of Caravaggio, illuminating her subjects with powerful stage lighting to heighten effects of emotional drama. Her figures were mostly heroic women drawn from history, mythology, and religious subject matter, including Cleopatra, Lucretia, and Mary Magdalene, often depicted nude and eroticized. Gentileschi’s most famous work, Judith Slaying Holofernes (c.1614–20), is notable for its brutality combined with a masterful rendering of flesh tones and fabrics.

Judith and Holofernes, ca. 1620

Oil on canvas
78 3/10 × 64 in
199 × 162.5 cm
Location
Florence
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