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RW
Rago/Wright

As shown: 70" x 14" dia. at base

Medium
Signature
Unmarked
Arredoluce

Arredoluce was a small-scale lighting manufacturer founded by Angelo Lelli in postwar Italy, a hotbed of inventive industrial design. The company produced lamps and fixtures by several significant Italian designers, including brothers Pier Giacomo and Achille Castiglioni, whose Tubino desk lamp, released by Arredoluce in 1949, typified their ability to reduce designs to their most essential while maintaining sculptural appeal; made to accommodate a small fluorescent tube recently arrived on the Italian market, the lamp itself is only slightly larger than its bulb. Arredoluce would also produce lighting by Ettore Sottsass, though the company’s best-known designs, variations on a floor lamp with a slender column, pivoting arms that allowed for maximum flexibility of use, and enameled metal conical shades, is attributed to Lelli.

Exhibitions
2017
Portuondo at Collective Design 2017Portuondo
2013
Mondo Cane at Collective .1 Design Fair 2013Patrick Parrish Gallery
Arredoluce

Adjustable Floor Lamp, Italy, 1950s

Marble, Brass, Tole, Acrylic
Bidding closed
RW
Rago/Wright

As shown: 70" x 14" dia. at base

Medium
Signature
Unmarked
Arredoluce

Arredoluce was a small-scale lighting manufacturer founded by Angelo Lelli in postwar Italy, a hotbed of inventive industrial design. The company produced lamps and fixtures by several significant Italian designers, including brothers Pier Giacomo and Achille Castiglioni, whose Tubino desk lamp, released by Arredoluce in 1949, typified their ability to reduce designs to their most essential while maintaining sculptural appeal; made to accommodate a small fluorescent tube recently arrived on the Italian market, the lamp itself is only slightly larger than its bulb. Arredoluce would also produce lighting by Ettore Sottsass, though the company’s best-known designs, variations on a floor lamp with a slender column, pivoting arms that allowed for maximum flexibility of use, and enameled metal conical shades, is attributed to Lelli.

Exhibitions (2)