Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia

Arcadia is a stoneware vase of baluster form, decorated with incised arches around the neck and base, and a fine crackle glaze against a ground in shades of gray. While the décor is abstract and essentially geometrical, it suggests the ruins of ancient aqueducts that remained visible throughout the former Roman Empire. This piece was exhibited at the 1889 Paris World's Fair, where Delaherche received a gold medal and secured his reputation as one of France's greatest art potters.

About Auguste Delaherche

In 1887, after years of working in various industrial arts firms, Auguste Delaherche acquired a Paris studio and began his career as a ceramist. He concentrated on simple forms with thick drip glazes inspired by Japanese pottery, occasionally employing relief decorations or modeling vases and dishes in vegetal shapes. Delaherche’s continual experimentation with kiln techniques enabled him to produce remarkably subtle gradations of color. By 1904, he had achieved professional maturity with his robust shapes inspired by Oriental, Greek or rustic pottery, thus helping to usher in the era of modern studio pottery. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1857-1940