Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects
Banksy, ‘Barely Legal hand stencilled back Drops 2006.’, 2006, MultiplesInc Projects

Part of the installation known as "The Elephant in the Room" from the 2006 show Barely Legal in
Los Angeles 2006.
Aerosol gold spray paint on red acrylic background on panel. Each panel is 4 x 10 feet. 2 panels.
The show featured a full size live elephant painted or rather camouflaged in the same pattern
"fleur-de-lis" to match the wall paper
of a posh living room. It is said that the intention of the artist was to show how western society
has turned a blind eye
toward the immense crisis of world hunger...
The work comes with written important provenance papers plus an auction catalogue where the
exact panels are displayed over 4 full pages.
Papers of provenance includes the original contracts for the show. A rare insight to how efficient
team Banksy works. Names has been
erased to compromise no one. Its the original documents.
Shipping is not included and will be at buyers preferred transporter and at buyers cost.
We will of course assist with the shipping. Specifics on provenance upon request.
Similar but apparently smaller panel sold on auction is 2003 for a little under 30.000 including fees.

The actual works and the event can be seen in "Exit Through The Gift Shop" 48:52 - 50:17.

Papers from Steve Lazarides. Original contracts (names erased).

About Banksy

Whether plastering cities with his trademark parachuting rat, painting imagined openings in the West Bank barrier in Israel, or stenciling “We’re bored of fish” above a penguins’ zoo enclosure, Banksy creates street art with an irreverent wit and an international reputation that precedes his anonymous identity. “TV has made going to the theatre seem pointless, photography has pretty much killed painting,” he says, “but graffiti has remained gloriously unspoilt by progress.” Banksy has gained his notoriety through a range of urban interventions, from modifying street signs and printing his own currency to illegally hanging his own works in institutions such as the Louvre and the Museum of Modern Art. Most often using spray paint and stencils, Banksy has crafted a signature, immediately identifiable graphic style—and a recurring cast of cops, soldiers, children, and celebrities—through which he critically examines contemporary issues of consumerism, political authority, terrorism, and the status of art and its display.

British, Bristol, United Kingdom