Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's
Barry Le Va, ‘Four X Four X Four (Complete Portfolio of Four Works by Various Artists)’, 1990, Waddington's

i) Barry Le Va: Untitled
ii) Sol Le Witt: Colors with Lines in Four Directions within a Black Border (Blue)
iii) Robert Mangold: Untitled [Sandback, 31]
iv) Mel Bochner, Untitled, dated 1968/1990 in pencil

Each published by Parasol Press, New York

From the Catalogue:
Four x Four x Four, 1990 is a complete portfolio of works by Barry le Va, Mel Bochner, Sol Lewitt and Robert Mangold, each with their own distinctive style. The portfolio is a comprehensive discussion between geometric mastery and minimalism. Le Va’s work reflects his traditional black-and-white restrained style, a monochromatic maze. Sol Lewitt was a leading force behind the Conceptual Art movement which gained significant traction in the 1960s. Lewitt’s visual language is intellectual with hints of mathematical equations and architectural precision. Reminiscent of fractal patterns or snowflakes his work in this portfolio demonstrates the consistent repetition of these hexagonal and linear forms fuse together the beauty of nature and the mechanical. In equal measure, Mel Bochner’s work also injects both the geometrical and conceptual with the basic language of relationships within space. Robert Mangold’s minimalistic touch is represented by his print’s deep maroon background with a simple black line, creating a grasping presence.
Courtesy of Waddington's

Signature: each signed, dated, and numbered 59/100 in pencil to margins

SANDBACK, 31

Prominent Private Collection

About Barry Le Va

With unconventional materials and reductive forms, Barry Le Va redefined sculpture by introducing new subjects, formats, and modes of production in the 1960s in tandem with Richard Serra and Eva Hesse, among others. He aimed to mentally engage his audience through process-oriented works (entailing layering, crushing, blowing, and spilling) that take sculpture beyond the traditional notion of fully formed, enclosed matter. Foundational to Process art, the seemingly random arrangements of ball bearings, wooden planks, and pieces of felt that comprised his earliest large-scale installations in the late 1960s entered into a dialogue with their surroundings. Similarly, Tachycardia II (2006), large blocks of aluminum and cast resin placed around a gallery floor, drew attention to the relationship between the objects and the space containing them. Critic Saul Ostrow has noted Le Va’s pursuit of “a rational subjectivity” In his practice.

American, b. 1941, Long Beach, California