Berlinde De Bruyckere, ‘Dekenstoel’, 1999, Phillips

Property Subject to the Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

Private Collection
De Vuyst, Lokeren, 22 October 2011, lot 483
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

About Berlinde De Bruyckere

Berlinde De Bruyckere’s sculptures are figural and disfigured; her anatomically detailed animal and human forms lack certain appendages or—more often—heads, to disturbing effect. De Bruyckere believes the particular presence or absence of a head is irrelevant because “the figure as a whole is a mental state.” The artist, who had a gory childhood fascination with Lucas Cranach the Elder, began her career in the 1990s and was immediately drawn to figurative works. In her earliest pieces, De Bruyckere used woolen blankets and furniture as her primary materials, purposefully suggesting the absence of the human body. Her later works replicate, exaggerate, and fictionalize bodies, most iconically featuring horses on platforms or in vitrines, and human figures partially transformed into branches.

Belgian, b. 1964, Ghent, Belgium, based in Ghent, Belgium

Group Shows

2015
Berliner Dom, 
Berlin, Germany,
Du sollst dir (k)ein Bild machen