Bruno Munari, ‘Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario’, 1971, Finarte
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share

Bruno Munari

Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario, 1971

Mixed media and collage
18 1/2 × 18 1/2 in
47 × 47 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
Provenance
F
Finarte

Please Note: This lot is sold subject to Artists Resale Rights, details of which can be found in

Medium
Signature
Signed, titled and dated: Munari 1971, Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario.
Bruno Munari
Italian, 1907–1998
Follow

In his prolific, 70-year career, Bruno Munari became known for various contributions to art, industrial design, film, architecture, art theory, and technology—including an early model of the portable slide-projector. He liked to (falsely) claim that his name meant “to make something out of nothing” in Japanese. Munari’s principles and beliefs were built upon his early involvement in the Futurist movement, which he joined at the age of 19 using the pseudonym “Bum.” During the 1930s, Munari began to move towards Constructivism, particularly with his kinetic sculptures, Useless Machines (begun 1933), meant to transform or complicate their surrounding environments. Throughout his career, Munari was captivated by both a sense of whimsy and the manipulation of artificial light. After World War II, Munari also developed radical innovation in graphics, typography, and book publishing, through the latter creating pieces he would call Useless Books.

Bruno Munari, ‘Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario’, 1971, Finarte
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Provenance
F
Finarte

Please Note: This lot is sold subject to Artists Resale Rights, details of which can be found in Finarte's Terms and Conditions

Medium
Signature
Signed, titled and dated: Munari 1971, Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario.
Bruno Munari
Italian, 1907–1998
Follow

In his prolific, 70-year career, Bruno Munari became known for various contributions to art, industrial design, film, architecture, art theory, and technology—including an early model of the portable slide-projector. He liked to (falsely) claim that his name meant “to make something out of nothing” in Japanese. Munari’s principles and beliefs were built upon his early involvement in the Futurist movement, which he joined at the age of 19 using the pseudonym “Bum.” During the 1930s, Munari began to move towards Constructivism, particularly with his kinetic sculptures, Useless Machines (begun 1933), meant to transform or complicate their surrounding environments. Throughout his career, Munari was captivated by both a sense of whimsy and the manipulation of artificial light. After World War II, Munari also developed radical innovation in graphics, typography, and book publishing, through the latter creating pieces he would call Useless Books.

Bruno Munari

Ricostruzione teorica di un oggetto immaginario, 1971

Mixed media and collage
18 1/2 × 18 1/2 in
47 × 47 cm
Bidding closed
Other works by Bruno Munari
Related works
Most Similar