Bryce Hudson, ‘Untitled Composition #15’, 2012, Duane Reed Gallery
Bryce Hudson, ‘Untitled Composition #15’, 2012, Duane Reed Gallery
Bryce Hudson, ‘Untitled Composition #15’, 2012, Duane Reed Gallery
Bryce Hudson, ‘Untitled Composition #15’, 2012, Duane Reed Gallery

Bryce Hudson’s paintings are as notable for their nuance and sophistication as they are for their compositional drama. His geometric oil and acrylic on canvas paintings can be described as having a certain movement and three-dimensionality while retaining a reductive quality that is general to geometric abstraction. The hard-edged forms are bordered by bright bands of contrasting color of varying angle and width producing multiple fields of form and color that play against one another.
Using a strict geometric language, limited palette and consistent yet sophisticated compositional format, Hudson achieves a remarkable diversity within a narrow framework. Often is the case, architectural elements are Hudson’s muse; flipping and dissecting elements, Hudson transforms them into a dizzying array of colors and shapes until all context is lost. Hudson’s edges are taut and sharp, and there is an inner tensile strength expressed in the forms. The bright color bands add weight and movement and provide a rich contrast to the somber predominant blacks, grays and whites.

About Bryce Hudson

Exploring underlying social issues surrounding race, gender, and beauty, Bryce Hudson works in an neoplastic printmaking style wherein geometries, color, and composition allude to an underlying symbolism. Hudson, who his biracial, uses shades of black, white, yellow, and orange as racial indicators, patterning blocks of color to explore notions of class. His art finds formal influences in De Stijl Modernism, Zen serenity, and Postmodern styles. By employing reductive, hard-edged blocks of color at varying angles, Hudson creates a sense of movement and depth, such that his color fields appear to vibrate. Exploring the power of digital media to manipulate, Hudson’s “Kentucky Gentleman Series” transforms the artist into a person of every race he has ever been mistaken for, exposing physical definitions of identity, nationality, and personhood.

American, b. 1979, based in Louisville, Kentucky

Group Shows

2016