Carol Bove, ‘Hieroglyph’, 2013, Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens

About Carol Bove

Carol Bove is known for her delicate sculptures made from materials as diverse as tubular steel, 16-million-year-old petrified wood, peacock feathers, and detritus scavenged near her studio in Brooklyn’s industrial Red Hook neighborhood, where the Berkeley, California native has resided since 2000. The aesthetic and intellectual traditions of her hometown shape much of her work— early projects included tableaux of European sociology and psychology texts—and she cites California assemblage art of the 1960s as an influence. The large-scale abstract sculpture Celeste (2013), a squiggly tube made of white powder-coated steel and installed outdoors in New York's High Line park, pares the forms of modern art down to their essentials—an attempt to create what Bove calls “generic sculpture.”

American, b. 1971, Berkeley, California, based in Brooklyn, New York