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BAM Photo Portfolio IV, 2001-2009

30 × 24 in
76.2 × 61 cm
Edition of 30
This is part of a limited edition set.
Contact For Price
Location
Brooklyn, Brooklyn
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
BAM
Brooklyn, Brooklyn
Follow

This suite of prints includes work by Anne Collier, Roe Ethridge, Anna Gaskell, Roni Horn, Louise …

Read more

This suite of prints includes work by Anne Collier, Roe Ethridge, Anna Gaskell, Roni Horn, Louise Lawler, An-My Le, Richard Misrach, Paul Pfeiffer, Matthew Pillsbury, Alec Soth, and Carrie Mae Weems. These 11 works, specially conceived for BAM by the artists, encompass a variety of techniques, subject matters, and …

Read more
Medium
Photography
Image rights
Images courtesy of the artists and their galleries.
Carrie Mae Weems
American, b. 1953
Follow

Steeped in African-American history, Carrie Mae Weems’s works explore issues of race, class, and gender identity. Primarily working in photography and video, but also exploring everything from verse to performance, Weems has said that regardless of medium, activism is a central concern of her practice—specifically, looking at history as a way of better understanding the present. “Photography can be used as a powerful weapon toward instituting political and cultural change,” she has said. “I for one will continue to work toward this end.” She rose to prominence with her “Kitchen Table Series” in the early 1990s, whose photographs depict the artist seated at her kitchen table and examine various tropes and stereotypes of of African-American life. Most recently, her achievements were recognized with a “genius grant” from the MacArthur Foundation.

Louise Lawler
American, b. 1947
Follow

In a continuation of the institutional critique espoused by Conceptual artists such as Marcel Broodthaers, Daniel Buren, Hans Haacke, and Michael Asher, photographer Louise Lawler questions the very purpose and nature of art. Often presenting “behind-the-scenes” views of the art world, Lawler has photographed the Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach art fairs, the Museum of Modern Art, Christie's auction house, and various galleries. Some of her best-known works include photographs of uniformed art handlers carefully transporting a Gerhard Richter painting, Maurizio Cattelan's giant Picasso head in plastic wrapping, and a Damien Hirst spin-painting shown through a closet door.

Anne Collier
American, b. 1970
Follow

Anne Collier considers herself a still life photographer—her subjects just happen to be other photographs and found media. Collier’s works dissect the conventions and clichés found in commercial photography, as well as their visual consumption. Some of her most iconic series feature record covers, photos of eyes in developing trays, photography magazine covers, advertisements, book spreads, and film heroines handling cameras. She’s particularly interested in revealing the relationship between cameras, sexualized women’s bodies, and the act of looking at these images. Collier is also known for her meticulous staging and lighting: all of her subjects are photographed in isolation against neutral backgrounds in her studio.

Roni Horn
American, b. 1955
Follow

“The unknown is where I want to be,” says Roni Horn, an artist celebrated for her cerebral, wide-ranging body of work in which she explores mutability—of identity and gender, natural landscapes and phenomena, language and meaning. Grounded in Minimalism and shaped by language, Horn’s sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, books, and installations reveal the subtle, moment-by-moment shifts in an expression, nature, or the meaning of words on a page. In Becoming a Landscape (1999-2001) and Still Water (The River Thames, for Example) (1999), she presents a series of photographs of the Icelandic landscape and of the Thames, respectively, that convey their state of unending change. In addition to Iceland and water, Horn focuses on Emily Dickinson’s poetry and her own androgyny. In a.k.a. (2008), she documents the mutability of her identity—at one the wellspring for all of her work the lens through which she views the world.

An-My Lê
b. 1960
Follow

MacArthur fellow An-My Lê uses photography to question the representation and commemoration of the Vietnam War in the United States. Lê, who fled Vietnam with her family as war refugees, aims to probe the disjunction between historical events and the way they are ultimately recalled—what she considers to be “the Vietnam of the mind”—by calling into question the accuracy of news reports and documentation. Her “Small Wars” series (1999-2002) features scenes of Vietnam War re-enactments, in which she often participates in roles as varied as a military translator and a Vietcong member. Lê also produces more documentary projects, including photographs of war games, ongoing Vietnamese immigration to Southern Louisiana, and United States military presence around the world.

Richard Misrach
American, b. 1949
Follow

Among the most important and influential of living American photographers, Richard Misrach produces large-scale color photographs that meditate on human intervention in the landscape and probe the environmental impact of industry. Misrach’s images also convey concern with color, light, and time. His best-known series, “Desert Cantos”, captures the awful beauty of human-wrought disasters in the desert; other subjects include the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and dramatic weather systems around San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. “My own agenda [is] foregrounding the importance of time in photos, in its infinite number of permutations,” he has said.

Paul Pfeiffer
American, b. 1966
Follow

In his sculptures, photographs, and videos, the New York-based artist Paul Pfeiffer considers the ways in which mass media and celebrity culture shape modern consciousness. He digitally manipulates imagery, often erasing elements from found sports footage, to investigate the impact of the spectacle on historical memory, race politics, and pop culture. Pfeiffer participated in the 49th Venice Biennale and was the first recipient of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Bucksbaum Award in 2000.

Matthew Pillsbury
French-American, b. 1973
Follow

Famed for his long-exposure photographs of interiors and cityscapes using only ambient light, Matthew Pillsbury’s images are consistently moody and atmospheric. Working exclusively in black-and-white, Pillsbury cites his most significant influences as Hiroshi Sugimoto and Abelardo Morell. He is fascinated by the role that technology plays in contemporary life: in 2004, he began documenting people watching television, the blinding white screens serving as the major source of light. “I don’t intend my work to be a salvation or a criticism of technology, but really just an opportunity for people to reflect […], ” he says.

Alec Soth
American, b. 1969
Follow

Using a large-format 8x10 camera, Alec Soth captures offbeat, intimate images of American life. He first gained recognition with his series “Sleeping by the Mississippi” (2004), lush, painterly color prints of landscapes and portraits shot over five years on car trips along the Mississippi River. Other subjects include Niagara Falls' honeymoon and tourism communities (NIAGARA, 2006) and the country's exhaustion under two terms of George W. Bush (The Last Days of W., 2008). In the tradition of road photography established by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, William Eggleston, and Stephen Shore, Soth documents suburban and rural communities throughout the Midwest and Southern United States.

Roe Ethridge
American, b. 1969
Follow

Roe Ethridge uses photographic images already in circulation—including outtakes from his own commercial work and images pulled from retail catalogues—as the subject matter for his large-format photographic prints, installations, and book projects. Mixing these sources into new sequences and contexts, Ethridge creates painterly compositions with renewed meanings. Though he explores seemingly disparate motifs, Ethridge’s work falls into loosely themed collections—what the artist describes as both improvised and systematic. For example, in his book Rockaway, NY (2007), Ethridge edges on a “coastal” theme, with images from the port of Mumbai to scenes of Rockaway Beach, Queens. His book Le Luxe—playing with the equally superfluous and essential nature of luxury—captures images from a six-year-long commission to photograph the construction of Goldman Sachs’s Lower Manhattan headquarters (during which came the 2008 economic crash). Paraphrasing William Eggleston, Ethridge has said that he is "at war with the finished."

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
BAM
Brooklyn, Brooklyn
Follow

This suite of prints includes work by Anne Collier, Roe Ethridge, Anna Gaskell, Roni Horn, Louise …

Read more

This suite of prints includes work by Anne Collier, Roe Ethridge, Anna Gaskell, Roni Horn, Louise Lawler, An-My Le, Richard Misrach, Paul Pfeiffer, Matthew Pillsbury, Alec Soth, and Carrie Mae Weems. These 11 works, specially conceived for BAM by the artists, encompass a variety of techniques, subject matters, and …

Read more
Medium
Photography
Image rights
Images courtesy of the artists and their galleries.
Carrie Mae Weems
American, b. 1953
Follow

Steeped in African-American history, Carrie Mae Weems’s works explore issues of race, class, and gender identity. Primarily working in photography and video, but also exploring everything from verse to performance, Weems has said that regardless of medium, activism is a central concern of her practice—specifically, looking at history as a way of better understanding the present. “Photography can be used as a powerful weapon toward instituting political and cultural change,” she has said. “I for one will continue to work toward this end.” She rose to prominence with her “Kitchen Table Series” in the early 1990s, whose photographs depict the artist seated at her kitchen table and examine various tropes and stereotypes of of African-American life. Most recently, her achievements were recognized with a “genius grant” from the MacArthur Foundation.

Louise Lawler
American, b. 1947
Follow

In a continuation of the institutional critique espoused by Conceptual artists such as Marcel Broodthaers, Daniel Buren, Hans Haacke, and Michael Asher, photographer Louise Lawler questions the very purpose and nature of art. Often presenting “behind-the-scenes” views of the art world, Lawler has photographed the Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach art fairs, the Museum of Modern Art, Christie's auction house, and various galleries. Some of her best-known works include photographs of uniformed art handlers carefully transporting a Gerhard Richter painting, Maurizio Cattelan's giant Picasso head in plastic wrapping, and a Damien Hirst spin-painting shown through a closet door.

Anne Collier
American, b. 1970
Follow

Anne Collier considers herself a still life photographer—her subjects just happen to be other photographs and found media. Collier’s works dissect the conventions and clichés found in commercial photography, as well as their visual consumption. Some of her most iconic series feature record covers, photos of eyes in developing trays, photography magazine covers, advertisements, book spreads, and film heroines handling cameras. She’s particularly interested in revealing the relationship between cameras, sexualized women’s bodies, and the act of looking at these images. Collier is also known for her meticulous staging and lighting: all of her subjects are photographed in isolation against neutral backgrounds in her studio.

Roni Horn
American, b. 1955
Follow

“The unknown is where I want to be,” says Roni Horn, an artist celebrated for her cerebral, wide-ranging body of work in which she explores mutability—of identity and gender, natural landscapes and phenomena, language and meaning. Grounded in Minimalism and shaped by language, Horn’s sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, books, and installations reveal the subtle, moment-by-moment shifts in an expression, nature, or the meaning of words on a page. In Becoming a Landscape (1999-2001) and Still Water (The River Thames, for Example) (1999), she presents a series of photographs of the Icelandic landscape and of the Thames, respectively, that convey their state of unending change. In addition to Iceland and water, Horn focuses on Emily Dickinson’s poetry and her own androgyny. In a.k.a. (2008), she documents the mutability of her identity—at one the wellspring for all of her work the lens through which she views the world.

An-My Lê
b. 1960
Follow

MacArthur fellow An-My Lê uses photography to question the representation and commemoration of the Vietnam War in the United States. Lê, who fled Vietnam with her family as war refugees, aims to probe the disjunction between historical events and the way they are ultimately recalled—what she considers to be “the Vietnam of the mind”—by calling into question the accuracy of news reports and documentation. Her “Small Wars” series (1999-2002) features scenes of Vietnam War re-enactments, in which she often participates in roles as varied as a military translator and a Vietcong member. Lê also produces more documentary projects, including photographs of war games, ongoing Vietnamese immigration to Southern Louisiana, and United States military presence around the world.

Richard Misrach
American, b. 1949
Follow

Among the most important and influential of living American photographers, Richard Misrach produces large-scale color photographs that meditate on human intervention in the landscape and probe the environmental impact of industry. Misrach’s images also convey concern with color, light, and time. His best-known series, “Desert Cantos”, captures the awful beauty of human-wrought disasters in the desert; other subjects include the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and dramatic weather systems around San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. “My own agenda [is] foregrounding the importance of time in photos, in its infinite number of permutations,” he has said.

Paul Pfeiffer
American, b. 1966
Follow

In his sculptures, photographs, and videos, the New York-based artist Paul Pfeiffer considers the ways in which mass media and celebrity culture shape modern consciousness. He digitally manipulates imagery, often erasing elements from found sports footage, to investigate the impact of the spectacle on historical memory, race politics, and pop culture. Pfeiffer participated in the 49th Venice Biennale and was the first recipient of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Bucksbaum Award in 2000.

Matthew Pillsbury
French-American, b. 1973
Follow

Famed for his long-exposure photographs of interiors and cityscapes using only ambient light, Matthew Pillsbury’s images are consistently moody and atmospheric. Working exclusively in black-and-white, Pillsbury cites his most significant influences as Hiroshi Sugimoto and Abelardo Morell. He is fascinated by the role that technology plays in contemporary life: in 2004, he began documenting people watching television, the blinding white screens serving as the major source of light. “I don’t intend my work to be a salvation or a criticism of technology, but really just an opportunity for people to reflect […], ” he says.

Alec Soth
American, b. 1969
Follow

Using a large-format 8x10 camera, Alec Soth captures offbeat, intimate images of American life. He first gained recognition with his series “Sleeping by the Mississippi” (2004), lush, painterly color prints of landscapes and portraits shot over five years on car trips along the Mississippi River. Other subjects include Niagara Falls' honeymoon and tourism communities (NIAGARA, 2006) and the country's exhaustion under two terms of George W. Bush (The Last Days of W., 2008). In the tradition of road photography established by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, William Eggleston, and Stephen Shore, Soth documents suburban and rural communities throughout the Midwest and Southern United States.

Roe Ethridge
American, b. 1969
Follow

Roe Ethridge uses photographic images already in circulation—including outtakes from his own commercial work and images pulled from retail catalogues—as the subject matter for his large-format photographic prints, installations, and book projects. Mixing these sources into new sequences and contexts, Ethridge creates painterly compositions with renewed meanings. Though he explores seemingly disparate motifs, Ethridge’s work falls into loosely themed collections—what the artist describes as both improvised and systematic. For example, in his book Rockaway, NY (2007), Ethridge edges on a “coastal” theme, with images from the port of Mumbai to scenes of Rockaway Beach, Queens. His book Le Luxe—playing with the equally superfluous and essential nature of luxury—captures images from a six-year-long commission to photograph the construction of Goldman Sachs’s Lower Manhattan headquarters (during which came the 2008 economic crash). Paraphrasing William Eggleston, Ethridge has said that he is "at war with the finished."

BAM Photo Portfolio IV, 2001-2009

30 × 24 in
76.2 × 61 cm
Edition of 30
This is part of a limited edition set.
Contact For Price
Location
Brooklyn, Brooklyn
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by Carrie Mae Weems
Related works
Most Similar