Château d'Yquem, ‘No. 18 "Château d'Yquem Millésime 1969"’, 1969, Chamber
Château d'Yquem, ‘No. 18 "Château d'Yquem Millésime 1969"’, 1969, Chamber
Château d'Yquem, ‘No. 18 "Château d'Yquem Millésime 1969"’, 1969, Chamber
Château d'Yquem, ‘No. 18 "Château d'Yquem Millésime 1969"’, 1969, Chamber
Château d'Yquem, ‘No. 18 "Château d'Yquem Millésime 1969"’, 1969, Chamber

Studio Job were introduced to Château d'Yquem through an important Antwerp based collector and entrepreneur, Serge Hannecart. After seeing the beautiful bottles in his collection, dating back to 1700s, Studio Job had an idea to make a wine bottle holder, cast in bronze. The Yquem wine, which they picked for this project, was the Millésime 1969.

The year was average in terms of quantity of total harvest, of which only 75% is eligible for the label. The wine is described as 'very creamy and lemony, more like a Barsac than a Sauternes'. Like all Yquem wines, it has an aromatic complexity: 'a slightly smoke nose, with a touch of petrol coming later'. As well as the holder, this wine also comes in a cooling box.

Image rights: Loek Blonk

Sauternes, France

About Château d'Yquem

About Studio Job

Based in Antwerp and the Netherlands, Studio Job, a design duo founded over a decade ago by Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel, produces one-off pieces of sculptural furniture that share little with the reigning aesthetic of minimalism and spareness. Their cast bronze works—tables whose surfaces are models of inverted cathedrals, lamps shaped like the Eiffel Tower—are laser cut for minute detailing and exquisite surface texture. Often described as “neo-gothic,” Studio Job’s pieces are fanciful without being kitschy.

Dutch