Chesley Knight Bonestell, ‘"THE MOON AS IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN". STUDY FOR "LUNAR LANDSCAPE", CA 1957, A 40 BY 10 FOOT MURAL COMMISSIONED FOR THE BOSTON SCIENCE MUSEUM'S HAYDEN PLANETARIUM, WHICH WAS UNVEILED ON MARCH 28, 1957’, Sotheby's

Oil on photograph over board, 41 by 10 inches (to sight), matted, glazed and framed to 52 by 21 inches.

From the Catalogue:
The "Lunar Landscape" was a dramatic depiction of the lunar surface as imagined by Bonestell. In his usual fashion, he planned the mural in exacting detail, calculating the position of the stars and planets behind an imaginary crater on the moon's surface replete with dramatic peaks, caverns and crater walls. A little more than six months after Bonestell's "Lunar Landscape" was unveiled to great fanfare, the Soviet Sputnik-1 satellite was launched, bringing back the first photographs of the lunar surface. Reality was far less dramatic than what Bonestell had imagined. Boston Museum officials quietly had the mural taken down in 1970, once they realized that it would no longer be seen as an accurate depiction, and six years later, presented it to the Air and Space Museum, where it remains. This interim study is typical of Bonestell's meticulous work, using his frequent technique of painting over photographs that he shuttered himself - his use of this technique is well documented starting from the 1940s.
—Courtesy of Sotheby's

Ex Collection of Frederick C. Durant, III

About Chesley Knight Bonestell