Chris Burden, ‘Deluxe Photo Book 71-73’, Phillips

Groundbreaking performance artist Christ Burden underwent a series of elaborate, self-inflicted performative trials in the early 1970s that have come to define the spectacular extremes of performance art. Contained within a black loose-leaf binder with hand painted front cover are the documentary contents of 23 of Burden’s most famous performance works executed between 1971 and 1973. Self-published in 1974, the book archives ephemeral performances that otherwise might have vanished into the realm of performative legend—no piece was ever repeated or rehearsed. The succinct, descriptive, typewritten texts and accompanying photographs bring each performance to light, laying bare Burden’s radical, audacious, and often painful practice.

Other examples of this work are in the permanent collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Courtesy of Phillips

Varying dimensions from 4 1/4 x 5 3/4 in. (10.8 x 14.6 cm) to 9 3/4 x 7 1/2 in. (24.8 x 19.1 cm) or the reverse
Each print and text sheet individually housed within a plastic leaf, all contained within a black plastic loose-leaf binder with hand-painted cover.

Signature: Each signed in pencil on the verso. Signed, dated, numbered 37/50 in pencil and typed copyright credit on the colophon. Typed lists of 'Exhibitions and Pieces' and photographic credits.

Artforum, May 1976, cover, pp. 24-31

Olivier Renaud Clement, New York

About Chris Burden

Los Angeles–based conceptual artist Chris Burden is well-known for his performance art pieces of the 1970s, including Shoot (1971), a response to the Vietnam War in which he had a friend shoot him in the arm with a .22-caliber rifle. In other works of self-peril, the artist was electrocuted, kidnapped, nailed, drowned, or lay immobile under a sheet of glass. Influenced by Marcel Duchamp and Dadaism and his interest in science and engineering, Burden has also created installations, models, toys, and kinetic and static sculptures, such as a rubber-band-powered model plane launched within a Concorde in flight.

American, 1946-2015, Boston, Massachusetts, based in California