Chris Ofili, ‘For the Unknown Runner’, 2011, Joanna Bryant & Julian Page

Only available as part of the complete framed set of 12 Official Prints from the London Olympic and Paralympic Games 2012 : Anthea Hamilton - Divers, Martin Creed - Work No. 1273, Howard Hodgkin – Swimming, Bridget Riley – Rose Rose, Chris Ofili - For the Unknown Runner, Rachel Whiteread – LOndOn 2O12, Fiona Banner - Superhuman Nude, Michael Craig-Martin – GO, Tracey Emin - Birds 2012, Gary Hume – Capital, Sarah Morris - Big Ben 2012, Bob and Roberta Smith - LOVE.

Lithograph on Somerset 300gsm Soft White Velvet paper.

Chris Ofili creates paintings inspired by personal experience, race, folklore, biblical narrative, and for the last few years the island of Trinidad where he lives. In 'For the Unknown Runner' a figure, somewhere between super-athlete and mythical being, sprints past a watching crowd. The figure is framed by a vase motif - a reference to the Ancient Olympic Games, which provided an arena for artistic and cultural expression as well as sporting excellence. 'For the Unknown Runner' is a powerful dedication to both Olympic history and the future stars of the London 2012 Games.

Since 1912, each Olympic Host City has commissioned one or more posters to celebrate the hosting of the Games. The official posters of the Games are now themselves a unique celebration of 100 years of the meeting of art and sport, and a body of iconic work has been created over the last century. For London 2012, a commissioning panel including Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota invited 12 leading artists to create images, using the Olympic and Paralympic values or the city of London as inspiration. Each resulting artwork is a distinct interpretation of either the Olympic or Paralympic Games.

About Chris Ofili

Turner Prize-winning Young British Artist (YBA) Chris Ofili draws inspiration from an eclectic array of popular, artistic, and religious sources, from the Bible and William Blake to blaxploitation films, hip hop, and his Nigerian heritage. His large-scale paintings—combining rippling dots of paint, drifts of glitter, collaged images, and most famously, elephant dung—work together in the service of a complex narrative about African culture, black stereotypes, history, and exoticism. His well-known and highly controversial work The Holy Virgin Mary (1996) comprised oil paint, glitter, polyester resin, and paper collage and depicted a black Madonna surrounded by images of female genitalia extracted from pornographic magazines, and lumps of dung. In 1999, New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani had the work removed from the "Sensation" exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Ofili's later work adopts simpler, more pared-down forms with similar themes.

British, b. 1968, Manchester, United Kingdom, based in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad