Chuck Close, ‘Untitled Daguerreotypes (One Sheet)’, 2001, Alpha 137 Gallery
Chuck Close, ‘Untitled Daguerreotypes (One Sheet)’, 2001, Alpha 137 Gallery
Chuck Close, ‘Untitled Daguerreotypes (One Sheet)’, 2001, Alpha 137 Gallery
Chuck Close, ‘Untitled Daguerreotypes (One Sheet)’, 2001, Alpha 137 Gallery

The present lot is a pencil signed and numbered daguerreotype that is part of the 2001 “Doctors of the World” series. This series also includes works by artists such as Sol LeWitt and Terry Winters. Of daguerreotypes, Close has said “I’m not interested in daguerreotypes because it’s an antiquarian process, I like them because from my point of view, photography never got any better than it was in 1840… Photographs are often so big now that twenty or thirty people can view one at the same time, but a daguerreotype is the most intimate image made with a camera, because it is small and only one person can look at it.”
Printer: Universal Limited Art Editions, East Islip, New York / ULAE & Brand X Editions
Publisher: Doctors of the World / Art of this Century, NY
This work is unframed and in excellent condition.
Literature: "The Art of Healing" which catalogues the works from the portfolio. Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration by Terrie Sultan and Richard Shiff (2014); Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration by Terrie Sultan and Richard Shiff (2003); Chuck Close: Editions - a Catalogue Raisonne and Exhibition - Butler Institute of Art (1989)

About the Portfolio (from The New York Times - 2001): ARTISTS DONATE PRINTS FOR "DOCTORS OF THE WORLD" - A dozen contemporary artists have donated new print editions to benefit Doctors of the World [Medecins Sans Frontieres], a group of medical volunteers who provide emergency aid at hotspots around the globe. The prints include a new pigmented digital output from daguerroeotype work by Chuck Close as well as a new aquatint by Helen Frankenthaler both printed by ULAE, new and exciting pigmented digital output Iris prints by Terry Winters and Susan Rothenberg, also printed by U.L.A.E. and Brand X Editions, a tabletop sculpture of a house by Louise Bourgeois in an edition of six, and prints by Jane Hammond, Rebecca Horn, Annie Leibovitz, Sol LeWitt, Elizabeth Murray, Darryl Pottorf, and Robert Rauschenberg. Most of the prints have been heavily discounted to encourage buyers." Back in 2001, the Chuck Close print sold for around $5,000.
This particular print was acquired directly from John Szoke Gallery on West 57th Street, which sold the original complete portfolio.

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Signature: Signed in pencil, dated and numbered in pencil (recto) from the edition of 100

"The Art of Healing" which catalogues the works from the portfolio. Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration by Terrie Sultan and Richard Shiff (2014); Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration by Terrie Sultan and Richard Shiff (2003); Chuck Close: Editions - a Catalogue Raisonne and Exhibition - Butler Institute of American Art (1989)

This particular print was acquired directly from John Szoke Gallery on West 57th Street, which sold the original complete portfolio.

About Chuck Close

Chuck Close reinvented painting with his monumental portraits, rendered with exquisite, exacting realism from photographic sources. Playing with ideas of scale, color, and form, Close has become famous for his rigorous, gridded application of individual color squares, which, although abstract up close, form unified, highly realistic images from afar. “I think most paintings are a record of the decisions that the artist made,” he said. “I just perhaps make them a little clearer than some people have.” Close’s artificially restrictive painting techniques stem in part from physical limitations—he suffers from an inability to recognize faces, and had a spinal injury in 1988 that left him largely paralyzed. Close is particularly known for his portraits of artists, having depicted Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman, and Richard Serra, among countless others. His work links him not only with Photorealists like Richard Estes and Audrey Flack, but also to Conceptual Art.

American, b. 1940, Monroe, Washington, based in New York, New York