Cindy Sherman, ‘Untitled Film Stills (Limited Edition Porcelain Tray commissioned by the Sundance Institute), New in Original Sundance Box’, 2015, Alpha 137 Gallery
Cindy Sherman, ‘Untitled Film Stills (Limited Edition Porcelain Tray commissioned by the Sundance Institute), New in Original Sundance Box’, 2015, Alpha 137 Gallery
Cindy Sherman, ‘Untitled Film Stills (Limited Edition Porcelain Tray commissioned by the Sundance Institute), New in Original Sundance Box’, 2015, Alpha 137 Gallery
Cindy Sherman, ‘Untitled Film Stills (Limited Edition Porcelain Tray commissioned by the Sundance Institute), New in Original Sundance Box’, 2015, Alpha 137 Gallery

Artist Cindy Sherman chose a rarely seen vintage image from her iconic Untitled Film Stills series for this specially commissioned gorgeous porcelain tray designed exclusively for the Sundance Film Festival. This highly desirable limited edition of 500 quickly sold out. Cindy Sherman's Untitled Film Stills are considered masterpieces of 20th century art, a major artistic accomplishment that ushered in a generation of appropriation, an invigorated criticism of iconography, gender and cinema tropes. To create her photographs, Sherman assumes the multiple roles of photographer, model, make-up artist, hairdresser, and stylist. In the film stills featured in this limited edition tray, Sherman, quite aptly, as its for the film festival, is again assuming the role of the actress. This work is in pristine condition and is offered in the original Sundance packaging (see photos), including a box bearing their distinctive logo tape measuring 9 x 11.5 x 1.8 inches. It makes a superb gift.

Sundance Film Festival

About Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman established her reputation—and a novel brand of uncanny self-portraiture—with her “Untitled Film Stills” (1977-80), a series of 69 photographs of the artist herself enacting female clichés of 20th-century pop culture. Though her work continually re-examines women’s roles in history and contemporary society, Sherman resists the notion that her photographs have an explicit narrative or message, leaving them untitled and largely open to interpretation. “I didn’t think of what I was doing as political,” she once said. “To me it was a way to make the best out of what I liked to do privately, which was to dress up.” Always in meticulous costumes, wigs, and makeup, Sherman has produced series in which she dresses as women from history paintings, fashion, and pornography. In the late 1980s and into the ’90s, she expanded her focus to more grotesque imagery, like the mutilated mannequins of her “Sex Pictures” (1992).

American, b. 1954, Glen Ridge, New Jersey, based in New York, New York