Claes Oldenburg, ‘PARIS REVIEW (MANHATTAN MATTRESS)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery
Claes Oldenburg, ‘PARIS REVIEW (MANHATTAN MATTRESS)’, 1965, Alpha 137 Gallery

This vintage 1965 Oldenburg silkscreen was printed in two colors on white, smooth heavy paper, and sold out many decades ago. It was part of a series of prints created over the years by renowned artists, including Andy Warhol, Helen Frankenthaler, Christo, Willem de Kooning, Louise Bourgeois, Alex Katz and others who were commissioned to create works to raise funds for the Paris Review literary publication. About the present piece, Oldenburg is recorded saying: "I started to work last summer on a poster for the Paris Review which took the form of a mattress, or the corner of a mattress. And this corner of a mattress, I think, led directly to an absorption in the island of Manhattan, which not only looks somewhat like this mattress, but also by the word "Manhattan" suggest mattress. You could think of saying Manhatress for example."
Published by The Paris Review; printed by Steven Poleskie at Chiron Press, New York
Unframed and in very good condition.

Signature: pencil signed and numbered front from the edition of 150

Publisher: Published by The Paris Review; printed by Steven Poleskie at Chiron Press, New York

About Claes Oldenburg

“I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something more than sit on its ass in a museum,” wrote Claes Oldenburg in his seminal 1961 manifesto I Am For An Art. From his Happenings beginning in the 1960s, to his enormous public sculptures of ice cream and rubber stamps, to his collaboration with his wife Coosje van Bruggen, Oldenburg has remained at the forefront of the Conceptual and Pop art movements. He has worked in a variety of mediums including performance, drawing, and writing, though he is best known for his large glossy or soft sculptures of ordinary consumer items, such as Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks (1969-74). Some of Oldenburg’s most radical works remain in the realm of concept, as in his proposal for Thames Ball (1967)—a giant toilet tank ball that would have floated on the Thames River. “I am for an art that grows up not knowing it is art at all,” he wrote. “I am for an artist who vanishes.”

Swedish, b. 1929, Stockholm, Sweden, based in New York, New York