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Clara Peeters, ‘Still Life of Fish and Cat’, after 1620, National Museum of Women in the Arts
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Clara Peeters

Still Life of Fish and Cat, after 1620

Oil on panel
13 1/2 × 18 1/2 in
34.3 × 47 cm
About the work
Medium
Painting
Image rights
National Museum of Women in the Arts; Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay
Clara Peeters
Dutch, ca. 1589
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Clara Peeters is one of the few known female Flemish artists of the 17th century, and one of the only to have specialized in still lifes. Little is known about her early life, but her earliest dated oil paintings are from her teenage years. Peeters’ early paintings featured valuable objects like goblets, coins, and exotic flowers, while later works included fruits, nuts, and confections. Peeters is also credited for introducing the “Breakfast Piece”—a still life showing the ingredients of a simple, everyday meal—into the Dutch painting tradition. These were typically arranged on narrow ledges and viewed from low vantage pints, against dark backgrounds. She was hailed for her ability to evoke a human presence through cut fruit, or partially eaten food. On occasion, she captured self-portraits on objects with reflective surfaces within her paintings.

Clara Peeters, ‘Still Life of Fish and Cat’, after 1620, National Museum of Women in the Arts
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Medium
Painting
Image rights
National Museum of Women in the Arts; Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay
Clara Peeters
Dutch, ca. 1589
Follow

Clara Peeters is one of the few known female Flemish artists of the 17th century, and one of the only to have specialized in still lifes. Little is known about her early life, but her earliest dated oil paintings are from her teenage years. Peeters’ early paintings featured valuable objects like goblets, coins, and exotic flowers, while later works included fruits, nuts, and confections. Peeters is also credited for introducing the “Breakfast Piece”—a still life showing the ingredients of a simple, everyday meal—into the Dutch painting tradition. These were typically arranged on narrow ledges and viewed from low vantage pints, against dark backgrounds. She was hailed for her ability to evoke a human presence through cut fruit, or partially eaten food. On occasion, she captured self-portraits on objects with reflective surfaces within her paintings.

Clara Peeters

Still Life of Fish and Cat, after 1620

Oil on panel
13 1/2 × 18 1/2 in
34.3 × 47 cm
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