Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase
Magical Mushroom Vase

Lévy-Dhurmer is thought to have designed the mushroom vase, although this has yet to be definitively established. Considering its depth of symbolism, his authorship seems irrefutable. The shape of this vase, conical, round at the base, and square at the top, is a form given architectural importance by the addition of four
the caps are painted on the body of the vase. Behind the cluster of mushrooms is a thorny brier. This Lévy created by portraying the below-ground structure of the mushroom, (the mycelium, made of thread-like hyphae) as a decorative web. Although the mushroom vase was made both during and after Lévy’s tenure at the Massier studios, it cannot be considered reproduction ware. The design stipulated the use of handles as stems, but each vase was painted with a unique palette and pattern of mushrooms. These different color schemes appear to depict different times of day. Model illustrated in Barol, Jean. Céramiques Art Nouveau: Collection Jean et Paulette Declein. (Vallauris, France,1995) 35. Model illustrated in Forest, Domique. Clément Massier: L'introduction de la Céramique Artistique Sur la Côte D'azur.(Vallaurius, France, 2000) 27.

-Description by Christopher Baker

Model illustrated in Barol, Jean. Céramiques Art Nouveau: Collection Jean et Paulette Declein. (Vallauris, France,1995) 35.

Frans Leidelmeijer, Netherlands
Historical Design, New York
Sato Moughalian, New York

About Clément Massier

Born into a family of ceramists, Clément Massier took an interest in the business from an early age. In 1884, after years of work, study, and travel, he relocated his share of the family firm to Golfe-Juan and began producing Hispano-Moresque-influenced pottery, with silver and copper oxide glazes made iridescence in a smoky kiln. Following the arrival Lucien Lévy-Dhurmer in 1887, Massier introduced fiery luster glazes enriched with etching and painting, applying them to forms ranging from hand-built individuality to slip-cast uniformity. He was soon in command of a busy factory and a showroom that boasted an elite international clientele. [Source: Jason Jacques]

French, 1845-1917, Vallauris, France, based in Golfe-Juan, France

Group Shows on Artsy

2014