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AG
Alpha 137 Gallery

This is one of the most rare and desirable screenprints ever created by renowned 1960s Pop Artist Sister Corita - exquisitely combining her sense of political activism with her religious passion. Pencil signed in a limited edition; the exact edition number is not known though believed to be fewer than 100, as …

Medium
Condition
Fine condition; not examined outside of original vintage frame; some nicks and scratches to wood frame but the artwork looks great!
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, hand signed lower right corner; unnumbered
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included
Publisher
Printed by Harry Hambly, serigrapher, Hambly Studios, Santa Clara, California

A contemporary of Andy Warhol and Ed Ruscha, Corita Kent (aka Sister Mary Corita) created eye-popping screenprints and drawings that combined corporate logos with excerpts from some of the artist’s favorite writers, creating an intersection between religious euphoria and advertising hyperbole. A sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles, Sister Mary Corita served as both an educator and an activist at the Immaculate Heart College, where she was head of the art department. In 1968, she moved to Boston to devote her life exclusively to making art. While her earliest pieces are religious, starting in the 1960s her work took a secular, activist turn, interspersing images from the civil rights movement and antiwar protests with politically charged slogans.

Collected by a major museum
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
The Mid Century Modern AestheticAlpha 137 Gallery
2015
Highlights from the Architecture + Design CollectionSan Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for UtopiaWalker Art Center
View all
Corita Kent
1918–1986
Selected exhibitions
2021
The Mid Century Modern AestheticAlpha 137 Gallery
2018
Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the CollectionBrooklyn Museum
2017
COME ALIVE!Circle Culture
View all
Corita Kent
1918–1986

In Memory of R.F.K., 1968

Silkscreen on beige art paper
30 × 44 × 1 in
76.2 × 111.8 × 2.5 cm
Edition of 100
.
$15,000
Ships from New York, NY, US
Shipping: $95 domestic, $195 rest of world
Certificate
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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AG
Alpha 137 Gallery

This is one of the most rare and desirable screenprints ever created by renowned 1960s Pop Artist …

Medium
Condition
Fine condition; not examined outside of original vintage frame; some nicks and scratches to wood frame but the artwork looks great!
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, hand signed lower right corner; unnumbered
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included
Publisher
Printed by Harry Hambly, serigrapher, Hambly Studios, Santa Clara, California

A contemporary of Andy Warhol and Ed Ruscha, Corita Kent (aka Sister Mary Corita) created eye-popping screenprints and drawings that combined corporate logos with excerpts from some of the artist’s favorite writers, creating an intersection between religious euphoria and advertising hyperbole. A sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles, Sister Mary Corita served as both an educator and an activist at the Immaculate Heart College, where she was head of the art department. In 1968, she moved to Boston to devote her life exclusively to making art. While her earliest pieces are religious, starting in the 1960s her work took a secular, activist turn, interspersing images from the civil rights movement and antiwar protests with politically charged slogans.

Collected by a major museum
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Corita Kent
1918–1986
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works from The Mid Century Modern Aesthetic
Other works by Corita Kent
Other works from Alpha 137 Gallery
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