CRASH, ‘THE USUAL SUSPECTS (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci)’, 1996, Alpha 137 Gallery
CRASH, ‘THE USUAL SUSPECTS (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci)’, 1996, Alpha 137 Gallery
CRASH, ‘THE USUAL SUSPECTS (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci)’, 1996, Alpha 137 Gallery

This artwork is the result of an extremely rare - indeed unique, one-off -- collaboration - a spectacular limited edition signed and numbered silkscreen, hand signed by ALL nine of the distinguished contemporary artists listed below (including the deceased Martin Wong) who participated. It was created in 1996 to benefit CRIA, Community Research Initiative on AIDS.
This is indeed a collectors item. More details:
Rare Limited Edition Hand Signed and Numbered Silkscreen
Hand signed by all nine artists (Unframed), who are:
Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci
What makes this work impressive is that each of the nine artists created a band in the print, so it's individual and collective.
Printed by Nenad Bozie, New York,
Published by: Avanti Galleries, New York

Signature: Ink numbered from the edition of 100, and hand-signed in pencil by all of the artists (Jenny Holzer’s signature in fountain pen)

Publisher: Printed by Nenad Bozie, New York, Published by: Avanti Galleries, New York

About CRASH

Coming of age in the Bronx in the 1960s and ’70s, John “Crash” Matos first picked up a can of spray paint at the age of 13 to cut his teeth as a graffiti artist by “bombing” the subway trains in the New York City rail yards. He has not stopped since. His bold, blocky signature—CRASH—greeted subway riders in the 1970s and ’80s, New York’s economically dire, artistically fertile days. By the 1980s, with the embrace of his work by galleries and at the urging of his friend and contemporary, Keith Haring, Crash was translating his explosive outdoor murals to the canvas’s more contained plane. He remains busy with commissions and collaborations, claiming that his future holds “more work, more painting, more strats, more walls, more lobsters, more steaks…in other words more living to do.”

American, b. 1961, Bronx, New York