Damien Hirst, ‘Opium’, 2000, DTR Modern Galleries
Damien Hirst, ‘Opium’, 2000, DTR Modern Galleries
Damien Hirst, ‘Opium’, 2000, DTR Modern Galleries

Since 1986, Damien Hirst has produced over 1,000 spot paintings. The dots, which may appear machine-made but are each done by hand, celebrate technical precision and the simple joys of color. Hirst’s spotsfollow a number of specific rules: The spots must be uniform in size, hand-painted in a perfect circle, and positioned in a grid. Almost always, every spot in a work will be a different color (and the spots are rarely black). “I...wanted to create a system where whatever decisions you make within a painting, the paintings end up happy,” explains Hirst. In 2012, the artist invited viewers to chase this sense of joy, challenging them to visit over 200 spot paintings exhibited across the world in each of Gagosian Gallery’s locations.

Damien Hirst continues to push boundaries through both imagery and technique. Experimenting with different print processes and materials, he is not afraid to try anything.

About Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst first came to public attention in London in 1988 when he conceived and curated "Freeze," an exhibition in a disused warehouse that showed his work and that of his friends and fellow students at Goldsmiths College. In the nearly quarter of a century since that pivotal show (which would come to define the Young British Artists), Hirst has become one of the most influential artists of his generation. His groundbreaking works include The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living (1991), a shark in formaldehyde; Mother and Child Divided (1993) a four-part sculpture of a bisected cow and calf; and For the Love of God (2007), a human skull studded with 8,601 diamonds. In addition to his installations and sculptures, Hirst’s Spot paintings and Butterfly paintings have become universally recognized.

British, b. 1965, Bristol, United Kingdom, based in London, United Kingdom