Medium
Condition
COA available on request
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, sticker label
Frame
Not included

Dan Attoe’s paintings depict natural wonders—waterfalls, beaches, mountains, rocky cliffs, over-sized forests—populated by tiny figures spouting even tinier diaristic missives, painted in silver and culled from the artist's stream of consciousness. The miniature humans disrupt the grandeur of nature with their small stature and utterances. His drawings share the same concerns but inverted—the phrases and disconnected images are larger and often cartoonish, creating small-scaled narrative vignettes. Attoe makes a small drawing every day that he keeps for himself—slightly larger drawings and paintings expand upon this practice. John Motley observes in The Portland Oregonian, “Multiple drawing styles reinforce the varying perspectives on youth and childhood, from pure, storybook fantasy to a less-innocent complexity, where fear and sexuality mingle.” Attoe said of his work, “The landscape can be enjoyed for its beauty, and the disparity between it and the figures, but it also exists in service to these contemporary people in funny or ordinary clothing saying everyday things about e-mails or engaging in interpersonal clumsiness.”

Selected exhibitions
2020
Dan Attoe: Glowing RiverThe Hole
2017
Horses - A Group ExhibitionV1 Gallery
Natural SelectionsPeres Projects
View all

Empidonax Flycatcher (Wood Lilly and Sycamore), 2003

Oil on MDF board
7 × 7 in
17.8 × 17.8 cm
.
$6,000
Location
Chicago
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Medium
Condition
COA available on request
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, sticker label
Frame
Not included

Dan Attoe’s paintings depict natural wonders—waterfalls, beaches, mountains, rocky cliffs, over-sized forests—populated by tiny figures spouting even tinier diaristic missives, painted in silver and culled from the artist's stream of consciousness. The miniature humans disrupt the grandeur of nature with their small stature and utterances. His drawings share the same concerns but inverted—the phrases and disconnected images are larger and often cartoonish, creating small-scaled narrative vignettes. Attoe makes a small drawing every day that he keeps for himself—slightly larger drawings and paintings expand upon this practice. John Motley observes in The Portland Oregonian, “Multiple drawing styles reinforce the varying perspectives on youth and childhood, from pure, storybook fantasy to a less-innocent complexity, where fear and sexuality mingle.” Attoe said of his work, “The landscape can be enjoyed for its beauty, and the disparity between it and the figures, but it also exists in service to these contemporary people in funny or ordinary clothing saying everyday things about e-mails or engaging in interpersonal clumsiness.”

Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works from Western Exhibitions
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