Dan Graham, ‘Highway Restaurant, Jersey City, N.J.’, 1967, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2015
Dan Graham, ‘Highway Restaurant, Jersey City, N.J.’, 1967, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2015

In his varied and prolific oeuvre, Dan Graham considers the psychological and social meaning of architectural space. This early photograph from the series “Homes for America (1966–67)” marks the beginning of Graham’s career-long investigation of space. Graham is represented by Lisson Gallery, London, where he has had many solo exhibitions. His work can be found in numerous major collections, including the Tate, London, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. He also participated in dOCUMENTA 5 in Kassel, Germany, in 1972.

About Dan Graham

Dan Graham’s interest in the social implications of systems, popular culture, and architecture is articulated in his installations, conceptual pieces, performances, videos, architectural designs, and prolific writing. Graham began using video as a medium in the 1970s as a way to engage his viewers directly, while attempting to restructure perceptions of time and space—a motive carried into his later glass and mirror pavilions. Circularity and feedback are major themes in Graham’s works, evidenced by his frequent use of mirrors, participation, and sometimes two cameras to create a loop. His influences include Larry Bell, Robert Mangold, Sol LeWitt, and Mies van der Rohe. In spite of his contributions to the legacy of media and installation art, Graham is still uncomfortable considering himself a professional artist.

American, b. 1942, Urbana, Illinois, based in New York, New York