Daniel Folkmann Andersen, ‘"Camouflage" series lamp in burnt orange, turquoise and black glazes’, 1916-1920, Gallery BAC
Daniel Folkmann Andersen, ‘"Camouflage" series lamp in burnt orange, turquoise and black glazes’, 1916-1920, Gallery BAC

At first sight, the "Camouflage” series designed by Daniel Folkmann Andersen (1885-1959) for the Michael Andersen & Sons pottery might be mistaken for the work of Thorvald Bindesbøll (1846-1908), whose ceramics designs at the turn of the century, with their distinct style of cloud-like organic forms and bold color juxtapositions essentially set the tone for Art Nouveau design in Denmark. However, Andersen created this series in 1916, at the height of the First World War, simultaneous to the first time camouflage was widely used militarily, and his homage to Bindesbøll would seem to take on additional themes in this context, perhaps speaking to the healing power of nature, a reminder of the optimism for a better world at the turn of the century, or a display of patriotism.

The "Camouflage" series was characterized by organically modeled forms with undulating silhouettes and an innovative surface decoration created by piping slip to form a network of billowing lines in relief. The slip pattern would then act as cloison-like dividers between different color glazes. Andersen experimented with striking combinations of glazes, using two, sometimes three color glazes for the fields, applied in billowing brush strokes, with a contrasting color on the cloisons.

Marked by impression “MA&S” and “1386”/ Base 14.5 in. (37 cm) H x 6 in. (15 cm) D

Signature: Marked by impression “MA&S” and “1386”

Manufacturer: Michael Andersen & Sons

About Daniel Folkmann Andersen