Daniel Joseph Martinez, ‘The inner yard of Märkisches Viertel. The Märkisches Viertel consists of a large housing estate of  about 17,000 apartments with chains of high-rises up to 18 floors that were built from 1964 to  1974. To the east it shares its border with the Rosenthal and Wilhelmsruh localities of the Pankow borough, from which it was separated by the Berlin Wall until 1989. In 2003 Märkisches Viertel  had about 36,000 inhabitants.’, 2017, Roberts Projects

About Daniel Joseph Martinez

Using text, image, sculpture, video, and site-specific street performance, provocateur Daniel Joseph Martinez investigates challenging issues about America’s social architecture, democracy, capitalism, and the relationship between personal and collective identity. “I’ve always embraced a means to open debates, as part of a method to allow art to become an active agent of the possibility that ideas can infect our daily lives,” Martinez explains. “This usually leads to some form of controversy in the work.” For the 1993 Whitney Biennial, Martinez created new text for the museum’s admission badges that read “I Can’t Ever Imagine Wanting to Be White.” At the 2008 Biennial, he presented Divine Violence (2007), which consisted of 125 panels, each painted with the name of an organization that used violence to effect political change.

American, b. 1957, Los Angeles, California, based in Los Angeles, California