Medium

For over 60 years, photographer David Goldblatt has documented the far-reaching effects of Apartheid in South African society with directness and humanity. A descendent of Jewish immigrants, Goldblatt’s own position as an outsider afforded him a deeper appreciation for the daily injustices suffered by South Africa’s oppressed majority. He rarely takes pictures of obvious violence or brutality, instead turning his lens toward the complexities of everyday life, observing the quiet suffering of black workers on their daily bus commutes or the casual privilege of white Afrikaners. In South Africa: The Structure of Things Then (1998), Goldblatt published a collection of photographs capturing literal and ideological structures that shaped his native country. He has expanded his practice in recent years to include color photography, as well as broadened his focus to cover the ravages of AIDS and consumerism on an already delicate post-Apartheid society.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
David Goldblatt: Strange InstrumentPace Gallery
David Goldblatt: Markers of PresenceGoodman Gallery
2020
David Goldblatt: Johannesburg 1948 – 2018Goodman Gallery
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Woman on a bench, Joubert Park, Johannesburg, 1975

Silver gelatin photograph on fibre-based paper
19 7/10 × 19 7/10 in
50 × 50 cm
Edition of 10
.
Contact For Price
Location
Johannesburg, Cape Town, London, East Hampton
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Medium

For over 60 years, photographer David Goldblatt has documented the far-reaching effects of Apartheid in South African society with directness and humanity. A descendent of Jewish immigrants, Goldblatt’s own position as an outsider afforded him a deeper appreciation for the daily injustices suffered by South Africa’s oppressed majority. He rarely takes pictures of obvious violence or brutality, instead turning his lens toward the complexities of everyday life, observing the quiet suffering of black workers on their daily bus commutes or the casual privilege of white Afrikaners. In South Africa: The Structure of Things Then (1998), Goldblatt published a collection of photographs capturing literal and ideological structures that shaped his native country. He has expanded his practice in recent years to include color photography, as well as broadened his focus to cover the ravages of AIDS and consumerism on an already delicate post-Apartheid society.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by David Goldblatt
Other works from Goodman Gallery
Related works
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