David Hammons, ‘Too Obvious’, 1996, The Studio Museum in Harlem

"A Constellation" (November 12, 2015–March 6, 2016) Venue: The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York Organized by Amanda Hunt, Assistant Curator

About David Hammons

Since the 1960s, David Hammons has confronted American cultural stereotypes and racial issues through wittily incisive sculptures, installations, performances, and body prints. Placing himself somewhere between Arte Povera and Dada, Hammons has made art from the refuse and cast-offs of stereotypical African-American life: chicken wings, Thunderbird and Night Train bottles, dreadlock clippings, basketball hoops, elephant dung, and bottle caps. From his X-ray-like body prints made with grease, to his "Spade" series of garden spades (a reclamation of the racial slur), to Pissed Off (1981), in which he urinated against a Richard Serra sculpture, Hammons combines political sentiment with powerful aesthetic statements.

American, b. 1943, Springfield, Illinois, based in New York, New York

Solo Shows

2016
New York, NY, United States,
Five Decades