David Zimmerman, ‘Tsewang Jigedol’, 2012, Sous Les Etoiles Gallery

David Zimmerman is an American-born photographer working in several locations from Taos, New Mexico to the Jogiwara Village in northern India. Over the past two decades, several of Zimmerman’s series, including Desert, Last Refuge, and recently One Voice, have focused on endangered landscapes and cultures displaced by environmental, social, economic and political causes. Zimmerman is the recipient of numerous awards including the Sony World Photography Awards L’Iris d’Or Prize in 2009 for his work in the deserts of the Southwest U.S.
His work is held in numerous private and corporate collections, and has been exhibited internationally: (2013) One Voice, Castello Di Rivolli Museum of Contemporary Art, Turin, Italy; (2013) One Voice, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Netherlands; (2012) Last Refuge, Center for Visual Art, Denver, CO; (2011), Last Refuge, Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York, NY; (2011) Desert, Hulse Warman Gallery, Taos, NM; and (2011) One Voice, Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography, MI, among others. In conjunction with the exhibition in 2011, Sous Les Etoiles Gallery published the book “Last Refuge” with an introduction by photography historian Carolle Naggar. Zimmerman’s monograph, One Voice, was published by Kehrer Verlag in 2017.

Signature: Signed and numbered on the back by the artist.

One Voice by David Zimmerman features haunting photographic portraits of
displaced Tibetan refugees. According to the artist, this series examines the
notion of place, which is “integral to the core of human existence in that it is
central to our feeling of completeness—or lack thereof.”
Despite the pristine, technical clarity of his images, the artist imbues his
subjects with a degree of mystery and a stunning depth. The intensely
personal portraits, described by William Meyers for The Wall Street Journal as
“both monumental and dramatic,” allow the viewer a glimpse into the life of
these nomadic refugees. As Zimmerman notes, “Much is revealed about these
displaced people through the expressions in their faces...their posture.”