Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design
Dominic Harris, ‘Indian Peafowl | Ruffled’, 2017, Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design

Pavo cristatus

#TheDazzlingOne

An emblem of integrity, beauty, luck, immortality and nobility, the spectacular appearance and behaviour of the male Indian peafowl, or “peacock” as it is commonly known, has enchanted observers for centuries. Painted in the most magnificent array of vibrant hues, he is more colourful than his female counterpart (“peahen”), and is characterised by his iridescent blue head and striking long ‘train’ of rear tail feathers, each painted with distinctive eyespots. Symbolising omniscience, wisdom and watchfulness, the peacock is a poignant totem in various cultures and mythologies, with many believing his tail holds the “eyes” of the stars. Often spanning 7 feet in width and standing 3 feet in height when fanned out on display, the peacock uses said impressive tail to bewitch potential mates and intimidate younger peafowl.

Image rights: Ian Scigliuzzi

About Dominic Harris

Since establishing Cinimod Studio, a multi-disciplinary, London-based practice in 2007, artist and designer Dominic Harris has gained international attention for his digitally-driven works of interactive art. Harris has devoted recent years to seamlessly blending natural phenomena with complex code through integrated electronics and innovative fabrication techniques. Inspired by the architectural interventions of James Turrell and Dan Flavin, Dominic offers viewers a sublime experience of their surrounding environment in his surreal installations that wryly illuminate the effect of digital culture on human perception in the information age. One of the artist’s most ambitious pieces invited participants to wildly gesture or attempt to change their own heart rate, which would in turn light up the London Eye.

British, b. 1976, based in London, United Kingdom