Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's
Eadweard Muybridge, ‘Selected Motion Studies’, Sotheby's

Property Sold to Benefit the Acquisition Fund of the Denver Art Museum

All but 11 on the two-toned leaf, and all but 13 with letterpress title, plate number, copyright, and date in the margin, 1887 (111).

Various sizes from 6 by 18 in. (15.3 by 45.7 cm.) to 9 by 12 in. (22.9 by 30.5 cm.)

From the Catalogue:
Ben Bailey, shown here in a boxing study, was the only African-American to be featured in Eadweard Muybridge's extensive, 611 plate study of human and animal locomotion. Muybridge's other models consisted of professors and students from the University of Pennsylvania, patients from a west Philadelphia hospital, and models from Philadelphia's Academy of the Fine Arts.
—Courtesy of Sotheby's

About Eadweard Muybridge

Eadweard Muybridge, originally a landscape and architectural photographer, is primarily known for his groundbreaking images of animals and people in motion. In 1872, a racehorse owner hired Muybridge to prove that galloping horses hooves were never all fully off the ground at the same time, a proposition that Muybridge's images would disprove. One of his main working methods was to rig a series of large cameras in a line to shoot images automatically as the animals passed. Viewed in a Zoopraxiscope machine, his images laid the foundation for motion pictures and contemporary cinematography.

British, 1830-1904, Kingston upon Thames, United Kingdom