Ed Ruscha, ‘Home With Complete Electronic Security System’, 1982, Waddington's
Ed Ruscha, ‘Home With Complete Electronic Security System’, 1982, Waddington's
Ed Ruscha, ‘Home With Complete Electronic Security System’, 1982, Waddington's
Ed Ruscha, ‘Home With Complete Electronic Security System’, 1982, Waddington's

Image/Sheet 12.6" x 42.4" — 32 x 107.6 cm.; 19" x 48" — 48.3 x 121.9 cm.

Published by the artist, Venice, California

From the Catalogue:
Throughout his expansive career, Ed Ruscha has continually sought inspiration from the American landscape and architecture. Home Security System, 1982 captures the cinematic vision of the American West with its elongated perspective and subliminal gradient of colour, harbouring a romanticism of the American Western landscape. The title reveals the playful nature of Ruscha as a master of Pop Art, the wide-open spaces that behave as deterrents, a sense of security - or the irony that such a system be in place where city crime and perils are worlds away.

Ruscha’s appeal beyond America’s borders has been secured for decades with recent accolades from the National Galleries Scotland paying homage to the artist with a full-career retrospective. The Home Security print series also forms part of exclusive permanent collections of major institutions such as: Tate Modern (London, England); MoMa (Museum of Modern Art, New York); LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles) and the National Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C).
Courtesy of Waddington's

Signature: signed, titled, dated ‘82 and numbered 77/100 in pencil to margin, with the blind stamp of the printer, “Wasserman Silkscreen Co., Santa Monica”

WALKER ART CENTER, 117; ENGBERG, 117

Prominent Private Collection

About Ed Ruscha

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

American, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, based in Los Angeles, California

Group Shows

2013
San Francisco,
Selected Works: Tony Cragg, Philip Guston, Callum Innes, Julie Mehretu, Martin Puryear, Edward Ruscha