Ed Ruscha, ‘Limited Edition Leo Castelli Exhibition Poster: Anamorphic Paintings (SIGNED)’, 1995, Alpha 137 Gallery
Ed Ruscha, ‘Limited Edition Leo Castelli Exhibition Poster: Anamorphic Paintings (SIGNED)’, 1995, Alpha 137 Gallery
Ed Ruscha, ‘Limited Edition Leo Castelli Exhibition Poster: Anamorphic Paintings (SIGNED)’, 1995, Alpha 137 Gallery
Ed Ruscha, ‘Limited Edition Leo Castelli Exhibition Poster: Anamorphic Paintings (SIGNED)’, 1995, Alpha 137 Gallery
Ed Ruscha, ‘Limited Edition Leo Castelli Exhibition Poster: Anamorphic Paintings (SIGNED)’, 1995, Alpha 137 Gallery

A prime example of where a signed vintage poster from the legendary Castelli gallery is more rare and valuable than an editioned print. New York: LEO CASTELLI, 1995 color-lithograph from an original sketch; First Edition produced in an limited edition of 500 prints; however those were not signed. This is one of the rarely seen hand signed editions by Ruscha from "ANAMORPHIC PAINTINGS" Exhibition held at Leo Castelli's (420 West Broadway) April 1st-25th, 1995.

Spelling out ‘SOAPY SMITH’ BABY DOE in a capitalized sans serif font which has been stretched vertically to extreme proportions, rendering the text very nearly illegible. It is impossible to decipher the words from most viewpoints, except when the viewer stands directly beneath the print, at its centre point, requiring it to be hung higher than eye level. Ruscha quoted in MacMillan 2007: "I was painting some of these anamorphic words [...] The idea [is] that these panels would be way up in the air and that you could walk almost underneath them. Then, you can position yourself to actually read those things, like ‘Baby Doe’, ‘Soapy Smith’, ‘Ute’ and ‘Ouray’. What did I call them? Stretch-outs or rubber bands or something like that. They also resembled, and I liked it for this, those sound patterns, and they also resembled dripping paint – if you put lots of paint on and watch it drip down in these vertical lines. So, the anamorphics, I always liked that. You can’t do that on a wall-mounted picture that you're looking directly at. You have to look way off at an angle. And you’re able to walk under and position yourself under those down here and you can actually read them. I’ve often wondered how many people have really discovered that." - The work is framed and ready to hang.
Measurements:
Frame
height: 40 inches
width: 24 inches
depth: 3/4 inch
Image
height: 36 inches
width: 20 inches

Signature: Boldly signed by Ed Ruscha on the recto (front)

Publisher: Leo Castelli Gallery

Cameron Whiteman, fmr President of PBA Galleries & VP, Bonhams

About Ed Ruscha

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

American, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, based in Los Angeles, California

Group Shows

2013
San Francisco,
Selected Works: Tony Cragg, Philip Guston, Callum Innes, Julie Mehretu, Martin Puryear, Edward Ruscha