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Ed Ruscha

Standard Station, ca. 1986

Offset lithograph card. Hand signed. Framed.
10 × 12 × 1/4 in
25.4 × 30.5 × 0.6 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,000
Ships from New York, NY, US
Shipping: $95 domestic, $195 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
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Have a question? Read our FAQ or ask a specialist.
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About the work
Provenance
Alpha 137 Gallery
Follow

This card depicting Ruscha's iconic "Standard Station" is boldly hand signed in black …

Read more

This card depicting Ruscha's iconic "Standard Station" is boldly hand signed in black marker by Ed Ruscha. It is from the Estate and private autograph collection of Cordelia Platt. Highly regarded in the autograph industry, Cordelia was the president of the UACC (United Autograph Collectors Club) and a …

Read more
Medium
Print
Condition
Excellent
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Hand signed in black marker on the recto
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Included
Publisher
Museum of Modern Art
Price ranges of small prints by Ed Ruscha
Learn more
Browse works in this category
$0–$3,000
This work
$0
$23,000+
Ed Ruscha
American, b. 1937
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Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

navigate left
navigate right
Save
Save
view
View in room
share
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Save
Save
view
View in room
share
Share
About the work
Provenance
Alpha 137 Gallery
Follow

This card depicting Ruscha's iconic "Standard Station" is boldly hand signed in black …

Read more

This card depicting Ruscha's iconic "Standard Station" is boldly hand signed in black marker by Ed Ruscha. It is from the Estate and private autograph collection of Cordelia Platt. Highly regarded in the autograph industry, Cordelia was the president of the UACC (United Autograph Collectors Club) and a …

Read more
Medium
Print
Condition
Excellent
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Hand signed in black marker on the recto
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Included
Publisher
Museum of Modern Art
Price ranges of small prints by Ed Ruscha
Learn more
Browse works in this category
$0–$3,000
This work
$0
$23,000+
Ed Ruscha
American, b. 1937
Follow

Despite being credited with a Pop sensibility, Ed Ruscha defies categorization with his diverse output of photographic books and tongue-in-cheek photo-collages, paintings, and drawings. Ruscha’s work is inspired by the ironies and idiosyncrasies of life in Los Angeles, which he often conveys by placing glib words and phrases from colloquial and consumerist usage atop photographic images or fields of color. Known for painting and drawing with unusual materials such as gunpowder, blood, and Pepto Bismol, Ruscha draws attention to the deterioration of language and the pervasive cliches in pop culture, illustrated by his iconic 1979 painting I Don’t Want No Retro Spective. “You see this badly done on purpose, but the badly-done-on-purpose thing was done so well that it just becomes, let’s say, profound,” he once said. Equally renowned were his photographic books, in which he transferred the deadpan Pop style into series of images of LA—apartments, palm trees, or Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962), his most famous work.

Ed Ruscha

Standard Station, ca. 1986

Offset lithograph card. Hand signed. Framed.
10 × 12 × 1/4 in
25.4 × 30.5 × 0.6 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,000
Ships from New York, NY, US
Shipping: $95 domestic, $195 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Read our FAQ or ask a specialist.
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Other works by Ed Ruscha
Other works from Alpha 137 Gallery
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