Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘RARE Lithograph with personal dedication to Frank Martin, legendary head of sculpture department at St. Martin's School of Art’, 1980, Alpha 137 Gallery
Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘RARE Lithograph with personal dedication to Frank Martin, legendary head of sculpture department at St. Martin's School of Art’, 1980, Alpha 137 Gallery
Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘RARE Lithograph with personal dedication to Frank Martin, legendary head of sculpture department at St. Martin's School of Art’, 1980, Alpha 137 Gallery
Eduardo Paolozzi, ‘RARE Lithograph with personal dedication to Frank Martin, legendary head of sculpture department at St. Martin's School of Art’, 1980, Alpha 137 Gallery

This lithograph is a rare Artist's Proof, bearing a personal inscription and dedication in pencil by British Pop Artist Eduardo Paolozzi to sculptor Frank Martin, head of the sculpture department of Saint Martin's School of Art from 1952 to 1979. Frank Martin brought young and forward-thinking sculptors into the department to teach, among them Anthony Caro, Isaac Witkin, Robert Clatworthy, Elizabeth Frink, and Eduardo Paolozzi. They and those round them came to be known as the New Generation of British sculptors. In the 1960s and 1970s the sculpture department at Saint Martin's was, in the words of Tim Scott: "the most famous in the art world". A rare piece - with very special provenance.

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Signature: Pencil signed, dated, annotated and inscribed to Frank Martin; bears publishers' distinctive blind stamp

Estate of Frank Martin

About Eduardo Paolozzi

Fascinated by modern machines and technology, Eduardo Paolozzi produced graphic art, collages, pottery, films, mosaics, and sculptures inspired by industrial engineering. His early bronze sculptures of anguished human figures incorporated impressions made by machines as well as found objects, synthesizing them to evoke new associations. This later developed into a new process of piecing together works from prefabricated aluminum and brass casting molds; the resulting geometric human forms have often been described as “totems for the technological age.” Crucially, Paolozzi came to embrace technology rather than perceiving it as a demon to be feared, and wrote and lectured extensively on how popular culture and science should inform sculpture. He is often cited as an important exponent of Surrealism in Great Britain, as well as an influence on Pop Art.

Scottish, 1924-2005, Leith, United Kingdom, based in London, United Kingdom